Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 09:00 • Brendan DeMelle

Before the Flood, Leonardo DiCaprio’s new feature length climate documentary, premieres on the National Geographic Channel on October 30th at 9pm EST.

So first things first, go to your DVR or cable app and set a recording. Since it’s airing in 171 countries in 45 languages, and also streaming on Netflix and Hulu and elsewhere, you really can’t — and shouldn’t — miss it.

Check out the trailer:

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 18:01 • Graham Readfearn

Rarely does the Murdoch media in Australia need an invitation to attack environmentalists.

Whether it’s backing climate science denialists or criticising environment groups for getting in the way of coal projects, NewsCorp Australia’s flagship The Australian newspaper is a reliable supporter of coal developments.

In recent days, the conservative media stable has pushed hard with a story plucked from the Wikileaks release of the email inbox of John Podesta, the chairman of Hilary Clinton’s presidential campaign.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 16:57 • Mike Gaworecki
Protesters against the reopening of Aliso Canyon
Protesters against the reopening of Aliso Canyon

It took two and a half months after methane first started leaking from the Aliso Canyon storage facility on October 23, 2015 for the state of California to declare a state of emergency.

By the time the leak was stopped in February 2016, the blowout at Aliso Canyon had caused an estimated 100,000 metric tons of natural gas to escape into the atmosphere, the largest single emission of methane documented in U.S. history. Thousands of homes had to be evacuated in the nearby North San Fernando Valley community of Porter Ranch, where residents suffered headaches, nosebleeds, rashes, and other serious health impacts due to the gas leak.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 15:41 • David Suzuki

Scientists worldwide accept that Earth is warming at an unusually rapid rate, that humans are primarily responsible, mainly by burning fossil fuels, and that the consequences for humanity will be disastrous if we don’t take immediate, widespread action. The U.S. Defense Department calls climate change a security risk “because it degrades living conditions, human security and the ability of governments to meet the basic needs of their populations.”

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 03:58 • Sharon Kelly

Safety laws meant to protect the American public against oil train explosions, pipeline leaks and other deadly risks have been repeatedly held up by slow-moving federal regulators, a newly released Department of Transportation internal audit has concluded.

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) — charged with overseeing 2.6 million miles of pipelines and the handling of a million hazardous material shipments a day — missed deadline after deadline as it attempted to craft the safety rules and regulations that give federal laws effect, auditors from the DOT inspector general's office wrote in their Oct. 14 report.

PHMSA’s slow progress and lack of coordination over the past 10 years has delayed the protections those mandates and recommendations are intended to provide,” the report concluded.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 00:03 • Larry Buhl
militarized police at Dakota Access pipeline protests.
militarized police at Dakota Access pipeline protests.

In a chaotic scene Saturday, October 22, law enforcement officers in riot gear used pepper spray and batons to break up a group of hundreds of Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) protesters during a prayer walk near Cannon Ball, North Dakota.

Authorities from multiple states rounded up and arrested more than 100 people on charges including reckless endangerment, criminal trespass, engaging in a riot, assault on a peace officer and resisting arrest.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 00:01 • Mat Hope
Exxon wintertime
Exxon wintertime

News outlets have heralded ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson’s claim that the company backs “serious action” on climate change as a significant shift in its stance on the issue.

The comments, made at the Oil and Money conference last week, would seem to align Exxon with European competitors such as BP and Shell, which have taken a stronger stance supporting climate action.

But Exxon’s actions speak louder than Tillerson’s words.

Monday, October 24, 2016 - 13:03 • Alex Kotch
Solar panels.
Solar panels.

On September 20, Duke Energy announced a $300,000 investment to install solar panel systems at up to 10 North Carolina schools. Numerous media outlets summarized Duke’s press release, hailing the company for its charity to schools and solar education. 

A footnote in the announcement is key: Duke is doing this as part of a $5.4 million settlement in 2015 with the Environmental Protection Agency and several environmental groups over possible Clean Air Act violations. 

The company denied any wrongdoing but settled “solely to avoid the costs and uncertainties of continued litigation.” 

Duke’s press release and much of its coverage failed to disclose two important details: Duke is heavily involved with the two nonprofits in charge of the solar schools project, and the company has been actively restricting the solar industry in North Carolina for years.

Saturday, October 22, 2016 - 00:01 • Kyla Mandel
Climate Hustle screening
Climate Hustle screening

This week, the creators of the American climate science denial film, Climate Hustle, flew to Brussels to attend a screening in the EU Parliament.

But the event, organised by the Eurosceptic Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy Group (EFDD) and UKIP MEP Roger Helmer, may not have been the politically tide-turning moment envisioned by its narrator, Marc Morano, executive director and chief correspondent of ClimateDepot run by the Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow.

With around 30 people in attendance on 19 October, Morano spoke to a room where about 60 percent of the chairs were left empty. Answering audience questions Morano delivered classic climate denial tropes, including arguing that sea level rise and extreme events are not anything to worry about and that humans are not to blame.

Friday, October 21, 2016 - 15:22 • Guest
USS Barry navigates Hurricane Sandy
USS Barry navigates Hurricane Sandy

By David Titley, Pennsylvania State University

In this presidential election year we have heard much about some issues, such as immigration and trade, and less about others. For example, climate change was discussed for an estimated 82 seconds in the first presidential debate, and for just 37 minutes in all presidential and vice presidential debates since the year 2000.

Many observers think climate change deserves more attention. They might be surprised to learn that U.S. military leaders and defense planners agree. The armed forces have been studying climate change for years from a perspective that rarely is mentioned in the news: as a national security threat. And they agree that it poses serious risks.