Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 18:59 • Graham Readfearn

As a way to sell your think tank’s ideas, get people to fund it or even just collaborate with it, there could be few more enticing prospects than being able to rub shoulders with seven Nobel prize winning economists.

In Australia, Danish climate change contrarian and head of the US-based Copenhagen Consensus Center (CCC) Bjorn Lomborg has been working overtime to respond to the fallout of the decision by one university to pull out of hosting an Australian arm of his project.

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Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 10:57 • Ben Jervey

It's been a disastrous year for Pemex, the state-owned Mexican oil company at the center of the nation’s landmark energy reforms.

In just over a month, Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) starred in three tragic incidents, two fatal. 

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Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 00:01 • Brendan Montague

In this DeSmog UK epic history post we meet David Henderson, who accidentally became one of the IPCC’s fiercest opponents.

David Henderson is a fellow of the Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) where he is valued as an eloquent and modest advocate of radical free market capitalism. But, his engagement with climate scepticism “came about in an entirely unplanned and fortuitous way.”

The former head of the economic division of the state-funded international Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) was, in April 2003, spending his retirement busily devising a book which he planned to call False Consensus: Dark Visions and Collectivist Remedies.

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Monday, May 25, 2015 - 00:15 • Brendan Montague

The rise of Andrea Leadsom to energy minister has correlated with generous donations to the Conservative party by Peter de Putron, a mysterious hedge fund guru – and her brother-in-law.

Leadsom was appointed energy and climate change minister in the wake of the Conservatives’ shock victory at the general election. She replaced Amber Rudd – who has been promoted to secretary of state.

De Putron, her brother-in-law and former employer, has donated £816,000 to the Conservative party since she first became an MP in the 2010 election. He has also provided funds for her local constituency party and further cash to pay for the staff in her office.

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Monday, May 25, 2015 - 00:01 • Guest

This article by Christine Ottery has been cross-posted from Energydesk.

Sajid Javid, the newly appointed secretary of state for the department of Business Innovation and Skills, has accepted over £16,600-worth of conference expenses from a think tank that has received funding from Exxon Mobil and the Koch Brothers – according to an Energydesk analysis of the new government ministers involved in energy and climate decisions.

Amber Rudd and Andrea Leadsom, secretary of state and minister at DECC respectively, have also been involved in controversies over previous donations.

Meanwhile, the new head of the DCLG replacing the controversial Eric Pickles, Greg Clark had no registered donations and Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth, under-secretary at DECC, has been involved in some minor political skirmishes.

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Sunday, May 24, 2015 - 04:58 • Justin Mikulka

In what came as a welcome surprise to activists in Albany, New York, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reversed an earlier decision and now will require a full environmental review for a proposed tar sands oil heating facility at the Port of Albany.

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Saturday, May 23, 2015 - 09:58 • Mike Gaworecki

Plains All American Pipeline, the company responsible for the 9-mile long oil slick polluting the California coast near Santa Barbara, is no stranger to oil spills.

The LA Times examined data kept by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration and discovered that Plains has been cited for 175 safety and maintenance violations since 2006, and incidents involving the company’s pipes have caused more than $23 million in property damage while spilling more than 688,000 gallons of “hazardous liquid.”

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Saturday, May 23, 2015 - 05:45 • Ben Jervey

For the first time in 76 years, a piece of Mexico’s oil and gas infrastructure has been sold to a foreign investor, and the deal will help bring fracked gas from Texas’s Eagle Ford shale region into Mexico. In this first major deal since the country’s landmark energy reforms, Pemex—the state-owned oil company that had kept domain over the country’s vast petroleum and natural gas reserves since they were nationalized back in 1938—sold a 45-percent stake of a prospective natural gas pipeline project to the United States-based investment funds BlackRock and First Reserve.

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Friday, May 22, 2015 - 16:22 • Ben Jervey

Peabody Energy would like you to believe that coal is the only way to light up the homes of the roughly 1.1 billion who still live in energy poverty.

A new campaign launched Thursday at the United Nations’ Sustainable Energy For All Forum in New York City offers a much different solution. Clean, distributed energy sources, argue the groups behind Power for All, can eliminate energy poverty more quickly and for a fraction of the cost of centralized electric grids anchored by fossil fuels. And, of course, without poisoning the air of communities and lining the atmosphere with even more greenhouse gases.

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Friday, May 22, 2015 - 00:01 • Kyla Mandel

Australian engineering and mining firm AJ Lucas’s share price nearly doubled in the first week following the Conservative party’s surprise election win on May 7. The dramatic jump in value coincided with the promotion of fracking-friendly Amber Rudd to energy and climate secretary.

On the day of the UK election, AJ Lucas was trading at AUD$0.30 (£0.15) on the London Stock Exchange. One week later, on Friday May 15, company shares were worth AUD$0.57 (£0.29).

With a majority government, the Conservative party has enthusiastically embraced the prospect of shale gas providing a domestic source of energy. Earlier this week Rudd confirmed the government would “kick-start” fracking by loosening rules regarding fracking under national parks.

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