Big Oil's in the House! (and the Senate)

Thu, 2007-08-23 09:28Emily Murgatroyd
Emily Murgatroyd's picture

Big Oil's in the House! (and the Senate)

The Center for American Progress has released a report cross-referencing oil and gas political donations with voting activity on a recent clean energy bill passed in the House of Representatives.

And surprise of all surprises they found that the more money a member of Congress received from the oil industry the more likely they were to vote against the bill which eliminates $16 billion worth of tax loopholes to oil companies.

The $16 billion is earmarked for investment in the development on clean energy technologies like wind and solar power.

American Progress found that the 189 representatives that voted with big oil received on average four times more in oil company campaign donations than those that voted in favor of the new clean energy bill. The 189 reps. received $109,277 on average from oil companies while their colleagues in favor of ending the $16 billion in subsidies to oil and gas received an average of $26,277.

Here's a breakdown of the oil and gas industry campaign contributions to the fine people voted into power by the people for the people.

American Progress released a similar report in June of this year that found that the 35 Senators who voted down a similar bill received on average $161,382 in political donations from oil companies. Those who voted in favor of the clean energy bill received a paltry $56,942 on average.

[x]
Solar farm

Pressure continues to grow for European politicians to agree to further reductions of greenhouse gas emissions between now and 2030.

The European Union’s 2020 climate and energy package, which is binding legislation, calls for emissions to be cut by 20 per cent from 1990 levels by 2020. In addition, the plan calls for energy efficiency savings of 20 per cent and a 20 per cent increase in renewable energy technologies.

While the European Union seems largely on track to meet those targets, later this month...

read more