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Thu, 2014-05-15 09:56Anne Landman
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American Sands Energy Corp. To Become Third Company to Mine Tar Sands in Utah

Utah tar sands
 
Yet another company is poised to start grinding up and spitting out eastern Utah's wilderness for its tar sands.  
 
Until now, the biggest threat to eastern Utah's wilderness has been the Canadian company U.S. Oil Sands, which amid protests in 2013 succeeded in starting a strip mining operation for tar sands at PR Spring, in eastern Utah's Bookcliffs range, about 35 miles west of the Colorado border. 
 
In what's shaping up to be a new rush to riches by producing dirty oil from unconventional sources in the western U.S., now another company, American Sands Energy Corporation (ASEC), has obtained the rights to mine tar sands and bitumen (asphalt) on 1,800 acres of private property in an area called Sunnyside, about 150 miles southeast of Salt Lake City.
 
The company calls the project the “Sunnyside Project” or the “Gibbs Project,” after the Gibbs family, which owned the property 30 years ago. William Gibbs is the chairman of the board and CEO of American Sands Energy Corporation.
 
ASEC couldn't possibly have found a friendlier place in the U.S. for its fossil fuel extraction project.
 
Sunnyside, population 274 in 2012, is a former coal town in Carbon County, and is so friendly to energy interests that up until 1994, it never had an elected mayor. Before that time, the town's mayor was the superintendent of mines for the Utah Fuel Coal Company. After Kaiser Steel took over the local mines in 1950, Sunnyside's mayor was the head of Kaiser Steel. 
Sat, 2014-05-10 16:40Anne Landman
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Seismologists Warn Fracking Boom Can Lead to More Earthquakes

Seismologists are warning that disposing of fracking wastewater by injecting it into underground rock formations may pose a far greater risk of setting off dangerous earthquakes than formerly believed. 
 
At the 2014 annual meeting of the Seismological Society of America in Anchorage, Alaska, scientists presented new evidence indicating wastewater injection wells can affect earthquake faults located miles away from the wells themselves. The new research comes amid mounting evidence demonstrating that oil and gas drilling operations in North America are causing man-made earthquakes, also called “induced seismicity,” or “frackquakes.”
 
Unfortunately, scientists say that there is no way to forecast which drilling or wastewater disposal wells will induce seismic events, but said induced seismicity could post a significant risk to the integrity of critical infrastructure, like dams, roads and bridges. 
 
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates over 2 billion gallons of fracking fluid are disposed via underground injection each day in the United States.
 
Fracking has already been directly linked to earthquakes, and scientists say drilling, fracking and wastewater disposal are responsible for an uptick in earthquakes in the U.S. in the last several years. Two geophysicists with the U.S. Geological Survey, Art Garr and Justin Rubenstein, found that a high volume of injected wastewater combined with a high injection rate increases the likelihood of triggering earthquakes powerful enough to be felt by humans. 
Fri, 2014-05-02 11:48Anne Landman
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Energy Industry Makes Last-Ditch Effort to Short Circuit Colorado Fracking Ballot Initiatives

Colorado's oil and gas industry is trying to short-circuit proposed ballot initiatives that would strictly regulate drilling and fracking by pushing a watered-down, last-minute bill in the state legislature.
 
The industry-backed “grand bargain” bill would give local governments limited, feel-good regulatory authority over oil and gas operations, like the ability to determine setbacks from drilling rigs and to charge “reasonable” fees for inspecting drilling operations. 
 
Colorado's legislative session ends May 7 though, leaving precious little time for the legislature to take up the measure. The bill faces only a 50/50 chance of even being introduced within the next couple of days. It would need a minimum of three days to get through the legislature. 
Mon, 2014-04-28 17:45Anne Landman
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Wealthy Corporate CEOs Behind Fake Anti-Fracking Ads

The online version of the Post Independent, the local daily newspaper in heavily-drilled Garfield County, Colorado, is prominently displaying black-and-white banner ads that read, “Blowing the Lid off Fracking Colorado.”

Readers are led to believe the ads are anti-fracking, but click on them and you're taken to a pro-fracking website, JobCreatorsNetwork.com, that boasts about all the wonderful jobs and economic benefits that drilling and fracking create. 
 
Members of Job Creators Network include the wealthy CEOs of major companies like Home Depot, Whole Foods Market, Staples and Best Buy. Members also reportedly have ties to groups like the Cato Institute and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. 
 
Despite this, the Job Creator's Network website complains that “Today, small business are under fire” from “confiscatory taxes and suffocating regulations…stifling energy costs…” 
 
The network holds it meetings and events in tony locales, like Scottsdale, Arizona and Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.
 
According to Little Sis, a free online database that details the connections between powerful people and organizations, Job Creators Network members give overwhelmingly (87%) to Republicans, and the group's biggest donor, Bernard Marcus of Home Depot, has given over $3 million to U.S. politicians. 
 
Far from being anti-fracking as the banner ads lure readers to believe, the JobCreatorsNetwork is not just pro-drilling, but anti-regulation, pro-Keystone XL pipeline, pro-coal, pro-offshore drilling and, of course, in favor of cutting corporate tax rates. 
 
“Fracking Colorado,” the group the CEOs target in their ads, is a grassroots group that supports a moratorium on horizontal hydraulic fracturing until it is assured the practice will not harm health, safety, air, land, water or water security.
Sun, 2014-04-27 10:00Anne Landman
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Untangling Colorado's Flood of Anti-Fracking Ballot Initiatives

Colorado voters who try to figure out all the proposed statewide ballot initiatives to regulate drilling and fracking are in for a real challenge. So far, 11 ballot initiatives have been proposed on the subject for the November vote, with many of them extremely similar to each other. 
 
It's tempting to think the oil and gas industry filed some of them as bait-and-switch measures to confuse voters and to try to pass a watered-down measure, but that doesn't seem to be the case.
 
So far all the initiatives appear to have been brought by people who truly want to change Colorado's existing regulatory regimen, which favors corporate dominance over the desires of residents.   
 
Here's a rundown on what we know so far about Colorado's slew of proposed anti-fracking ballot measures.
Fri, 2014-04-25 05:00Anne Landman
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Ohio Geologists Link Earthquakes to Fracking, State Introduces Seismic Monitoring

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources announced earlier this month that it will start requiring oil and gas companies to install networks of sensitive seismic monitors on their wells to detect small earthquakes that could be caused by hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking.” 

The special requirement will kick in if companies request permits to drill horizontal wells within three miles of known fault lines, or where earthquakes greater than a 2.0 magnitude have already been recorded. If the monitors detect any tremors in excess of 1.0 magnitude, drilling must cease while experts investigate the cause of the seismic activity. 

The new rules are the department's response to recent earthquakes in Ohio's Poland Township in Mahoning County — which Rick Simmers, chief of the Ohio Department of Natural Resource's oil and gas division, says have a “probable connection” to hydraulic fracturing activity in the area.

The March earthquakes mark the first time state geologists in Ohio have definitively linked earthquakes to gas drilling. They believe that fracking for gas in the Utica Shale beneath the Appalachian mountains caused five earthquakes in the area by increasing pressure on a previously unknown fault. 

Ohio has also imposed an indefinite moratorium on new drilling in the area of the earthquakes, but will allow extraction to continue at five other existing wells at the site.

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