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Tue, 2014-02-18 15:31Mike G
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Chevron Tries A New PR Trick: Free Pizza to Neighbors of Exploded Gas Well

Chevron is known for responding aggresively to anyone who tries to hold the company accountable. The creativity the company applies to evading responsibility for its messes is arguably unparalleled.

Even still, Chevron's latest PR move, after one of its natural gas pipelines exploded and burned for five days in southwestern Pennsylvania, is probably the first time free pizza was involved.

When the city of Richmond, CA sued Chevron for damages related to an explosion at one of the company's refineries in 2012, a Chevron spokesman responded by attacking the city's “failed leadership.”

When 30,000 Indigenous and rural Ecuadoreans won a $9bn judgement against Chevron in compensation for the decades-worth of oil pollution the company left in their Amazonian home, Chevron pulled every dirty legal trick in the book, including filing racketeering charges against the plaintiffs, to delay justice.

So what did the residents of Bobtown, PA get if they were concerned about the massive column of flame and toxic fallout from Chevron's natural gas pipeline explosion? Aside from a pretty standard apology letter, they got a coupon for a free pizza (“special combo only,” per the coupon itself, so don't even think about getting extra toppings you moochers) and two-liter soft drink.

Philly.com calls it: “The Chevron Guarantee: Our well won't explode…or your pizza is free!”

It's probably best if I just let the late-night comedians take it from here…

Tue, 2014-02-18 11:24Mike G
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Nobody Knows How Much Fracking is Happening Off California's Coast

The modern environmental movement was born when a drilling platform blew out and some 100,000 gallons of oil spilled into the Santa Barbara Channel in 1969, polluting California’s famous coastline. Yet as the race to exploit the vast amount of oil in the Monterey Shale heats up, environmentalists are warning that the state of California's lax oversight of the controversial oil production practice known as fracking, especially when it occurs on offshore oil drilling platforms, could lead to another major disaster.

Last October, the Associated Press revealed that offshore fracking is occurring much more frequently than California officials are aware. More than 200 fracking projects were discovered to have taken place over the preceding two decades in waters near Long Beach, Seal Beach, and Huntington Beach, some of the California coast’s most famous attractions.

Because fracking involves injecting water, sand, and a slew of toxic chemicals deep underground at extremely high pressure to break up the rock formations where oil is trapped, there's not just the risk of another oil spill polluting Cali's beaches but a number of threats that are not fully understood.

California passed a law last year that included some basic requirements for oil companies to disclose what chemicals are used in fracking fluids and to obtain a permit from the state for fracking operations, but the Los Angeles Times, echoing the sentiments of many environmentalists and legislators, said the law had been “so watered down as to be useless.”

The oil industry continues to insist that fracking is totally safe, even as it attempts to evade any and all new regulations. According to the Surfrider Foundation: “Despite [the] industry vowing to conduct their activities in a transparent and open fashion, the fracking industry has repeatedly failed to provide notice of offshore fracking…to the [California] Coastal Commission.”

Other than another spill, the chief concern is that the oil industry is allowed by federal regulators to dump as much as 9 billion gallons of wastewater into the ocean every year, and no one knows what the impact of fracking chemicals will be on ocean and coastal ecosystems.

“To date, little data has been collected,” says Allison Dettmer, deputy director of the California Coastal Commission.

Tue, 2014-02-11 13:01Mike G
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Disastrous Day in Fossil Fuels: WV coal slurry spill, PA gas well explosion, ND gas explosion

West Virginia officials are reporting that a coal slurry line at the Kanawha Eagle Prep Plant, which belongs to Patriot Coal, ruptured and spilled a toxic byproduct from the coal mining and preparation process into a creek that feeds the Kanawha River early this morning. More than 100,000 gallons of slurry spilled, and state officials are monitoring potential impacts on public health and the local water supply.

West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) officials say the leak is “significant” and are comparing it to last month's Freedom Industries’ coal chemical spill into the Elk River, which contaminated the tapwater of 300,000 West Virginians.

Incredibly, that’s just one of the fossil fuels disasters that happened today. Just a few miles across the border from West Virginia, a natural gas well operated by Chevron in Dilliner, Pennsylvania exploded and continues to burn, as firefighters cannot get close enough to extinguish it, due to the intense heat. One person was injured and taken to the hospital, and another person remains missing.

Another natural gas explosion was reported last night, this one in Tioga, North Dakota. Hiland Partners operates the pipeline that ruptured, leading to an explosion and fire that could be seen, apparently, for miles. Randall Pederson of the Tioga Fire and Ambulance Department told the Bismarck Tribune that he “could see a large glow south of town” so he knew it was a big blaze even before he got to the scene.

Here is one YouTube user's video of the scene in Tioga last night:



We’ll keep you updated on all of these stories as the day progresses.

Image credit: WSAZ via Twitter

**UPDATE**

Tue, 2014-01-21 17:35Mike G
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Wall Street Journal Investigation: High-Tech Oil Pipeline Monitors Catch Less Than 20 Percent Of Leaks

Last September, a farmer harvesting wheat in North Dakota smelled crude oil in his fields. That was the first indication anyone had that a Tesoro pipeline had ruptured and spewed some 20,000 barrels of oil into the environment.

Tesoro says it has beefed up its monitoring of the pipeline, as the pressure sensors it had installed before the spill did not detect the slow seep of oil, even though it had soaked a surrounding area the size of six football fields.

This may sound like an outlier case, but as it turns out, it is pretty much the industry standard. According to an investigation by the Wall Street Journal, it is all too common that oil companies are the last to know when their pipelines spring a leak.

Coming just a week after Canada’s foreign minister traveled to Washington, D.C., and called on the Obama administration to make a decision on Keystone XL pipeline, the results of the paper's analysis contradict the oil industry’s claims that the safety of pipelines can be ensured through existing measures.

According to the Wall Street Journal, which looked at Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration data on 251 spills that occurred on private property since 2010, the industry's pipeline monitoring equipment was the first to detect a leak in just 19.5 percent of incidents.

The other 80 percent of the time leaks are generally discovered by people — local residents and landowners, like that North Dakota wheat farmer, as well as on-site employees of the oil and pipeline companies.

Wed, 2013-11-13 08:10Mike G
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Oil Train Derailment, Explosion In Alabama Points To Need For Tighter Regulation

We’re all used to seeing oil spills at sea, or oil spewing from a ruptured pipeline. But lately we’ve been presented with a new image of oil spills with increasing frequency: train derailment.

Last Friday, a train carrying crude oil from the Bakken shale in North Dakota was traveling through a rural part of Alabama when 20 of its cars derailed and exploded. Firefighters left 11 of the cars to burn themselves out overnight. Flames were reportedly shooting 300 feet into the air.

The cause of the accident, as well as the extent of the oil spill into a surrounding wetlands area, can’t be determined until the fire stops burning, which officials say could take several days.

This was not the only train carrying crude oil that derailed in recent memory. It wasn’t even the only train derailment last week.

Wed, 2013-11-06 17:44Mike G
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Oil Industry Spending Big To Win Unfettered Fracking Rights In The Golden State

There’s a lot of money at stake for oil companies that want to frack California’s Monterey Shale, so it’s no wonder Big Oil is spending big to forestall any new environmental regulations from biting into profits.

Here’s a particularly striking case in point: Just a week before the California State Senate voted on a bill that would impose new regulations on fracking activities, the Western States Petroleum Association (which represents the likes of Exxon, Chevron, BP, Occidental, Valero, Phillips 66, etc.) treated a dozen lawmakers to a lavish $13,000, 5-course meal at The Kitchen, one of Sacramento’s fanciest restaurants.

Two weeks later, the bill was signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown, but by then lobbyists had managed to weaken the bill to the point that many environmentalists had withdrawn their support.

Before they passed [the bill], lawmakers accepted new amendments from the oil and gas industry – amendments that undermine the original intent… changing it into a bill we simply can’t support,” said the California League of Conservation Voters.

That $13,000 dinner is a drop in the bucket, of course.

So far in 2013, the oil and gas industry has already spent over $11.5 million on lobbying efforts in California, and it’s not just fracking regulations that are in Big Oil’s crosshairs.

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