Coal Industry Spin Doctor Joe Lucas Refuses to Admit Coal Contributes to Global Warming

Thu, 2009-03-05 10:39Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

Coal Industry Spin Doctor Joe Lucas Refuses to Admit Coal Contributes to Global Warming

In an interview on CNN, Joe Lucas, the Vice President of the Americans for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE) refused to admit that burning coal contributes to global warming.

This shouldn’t come as a shocker to anyone in the know, Lucas has spent the better part of decade running public campaigns that donwplay the realities of climate change. As you can see on his new website for ACCCE Lucas is trying hard to shed that past and wrap his latest coal lobby project in a blanket of green:

accce-clean-coal-joe lucas

But a wolf can only hide in a sheep’s green clothing for so long before they slip.

Lucas stunningly refuses to admit in the CNN interview whether or not the burning of coal even contributes to global warming.

NARRATOR: Still, the industry refuses to say its plants contribute to global warming.

INTERVIEWER: Can you just answer that yes or no–If you believe that burning coal causes global warming?

JOE LUCAS (shaking head no): I don’t know. I am not a scientist.

Actually Joe, you don’t need to be a scientist to know that burning coal contributes 40 percent of U.S. CO2 emissions.

You can watch it online here on CNN.com (approximately 2:00 minutes in): No country for ‘coal’ men


This month we’re giving away FREE copies Keith Farnish’s new book Times Up: an uncivilzed solution to a global crisis.

Go here to find out more details about DeSmogBlog’s monthly book give-away.

 

Comments

The investment into alternative power generating technologies such as nuclear energy may need to be measured against the potential cost when things turn against you as unfortunately happened this year in Japan. The use of thermal coal (steam coal) that is mostly burnt for power generation may be valid for other countries who may not be able to allocate resources and funds to alternative and more greener sources of power. Coal newsletters and coal statistics show developing economies are more likely to increase their investment into & their use of thermal coal & metallurgical coal in coming years because of coal’s affordability and ability to quickly meet increasing demands for electricity and steel. Cherry of www.coalportal.com

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