Proposed Aviation Law Will Test President Obama's Climate Change Commitment

Tue, 2012-11-13 16:04Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

Proposed Aviation Law Will Test President Obama's Climate Change Commitment

In his acceptance speech last Tuesday, President Obama stated that: “We want our children to live in an America that isn't burdened by debt, that isn't weakened by inequality, that isn't threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet.”

The President's words will be put to the test very shortly.

As Glenn Hurowitz points out on Grist, a bill is about to land on the President's desk that will allow US airlines to ignore a European Union climate law.

Hurowitz writes:

“If he signs the bill, Obama will not only be failing to take sufficient action to address climate change, but actively going out of his way to stop another country from doing so – a pretty extreme act at the worst possible time.”

This is a line in the sand and a really big deal. We will soon know if President Obama plans to stay true to his word on his commitment to curb the emissions of climate change pollution by industry in the United States.

Hurowitz's piece is well worth the read, as it goes into a lot of detail on the issue of transnational aviation and climate change policy.

Previous Comments

That EU program is now on hold;

Caving To Pressure, Isolated EU Halts Aviation Emissions Scheme

 Date: 11/12/12
    Will Nichols and James Murray, BusinessGreen

“Brussels today announced it will freeze its carbon regulations on flights to and from the EU for a year, giving the UN’s international aviation body 12 months to deliver a global deal for tackling greenhouse gas emissions from the sector.

European Climate Commissioner Connie Hedegaard said the move followed the “very good news” coming out of last Friday’s International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) meeting where delegates recognised global market-based measures (MBMs) for tackling emissions are feasible and agreed to deliver a final package of proposals at its conference next September.”

The decision comes after Brussels faced down pressure from the US, China, India, and several other major nations who viewed the regulation as a breach of international agreements.

the progress we are making on GHG is painfully slow. That the president at leaste recognizes the dire situation we are in is better then the 'other' candiate who lost November 6th.