Conservatives tout former government's climate change action as their own

Mon, 2007-11-05 12:04Kevin Grandia
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Conservatives tout former government's climate change action as their own

In reaction to the criticism leveled at the Canadian government today over massive cuts to climate change research, Environment minister John Baird defended his government's record by touting climate research programs initiated, not by his party, but by the former governing Liberals.

Baird stated:

they are sponsoring projects such as $150 million in funding for Arctic research for the International Polar Year and more than $1.5 billion in spending for new technologies.”

But a quick check of the “Arctic Research” program referred to by the Minister shows that it began requesting proposals on December 19, 2005 - the Conservative party did not come into power until January 23, 2006.

Baird went on to say that his government was taking concrete action to respond to “world class scientific evidence” that suggests we should be… lowering greenhouse gas emissions from large industrial polluters.”

Canadian scientists are calling the Minister on his bafflegab.

Top Canadian scientists are reporting that the Canadian government is shutting down a federal climate change research network and blocking new studies on the impact of rising greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere.

Previous Comments

Just putting things in context.

From the Google cache:

“The site is managed by Kevin Grandia, a former political aide to Liberal MP Raymond Chan, and posts regular contributions from the likes of American journalist and author Ross Gelbspan and science writer and former Vancouver Sun staffer Richard Littlemore.

John Lefebvre, the so-called “teddy bear hippie” millionaire from Saltspring Island who recently ran into legal troubles in the U.S. on allegations of promoting illegal Internet gambling, is listed on the site as a benefactor.

Lefebvre, 55, remains in the U.S. on a $5-million bond pending a court hearing which is scheduled to begin Wednesday.”

http://72.14.205.104/search?q=cache:GCI-Iy5Q1csJ:www.canada.com/vancouversun/story.html%3Fid%3Dd48ae53b-cb6e-4aa4-9f36-fc392e4521d3+%22kevin+grandia%22+liberal&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=9&gl=ca

was Baird or was Baird NOT referring to a project initiated before the Conservative government came to power? Stick to the point please.

Obviously, the point of Grandia’s article was to crap on the Conservatives. Besides, if you want a true gauge of how “comitted” the Liberals are to the environment, remind us again which opposition leader (who named his dog “Kyoto”, LOL!) didn’t bring down the government over the last Throne Speech, for the sake of political expediency. You know, the speech that gave the Kyoto Protocol a well-deserved, final heave-ho.

Besides, why would you care what I have to say on the matter? Aren’t you convinced that I’m some guy from Minnesota because my name happens to be “Rob”? And therefore, by virtue of having the name “Rob”, I must be paid by Exxon, which proves your theory, or something?

I don’t really care what you have to say because you just tend to clutter up the site with blether. You may or may not be some guy from North Dakota who touts his blog as “ND’s most popular political blog”. But the bottom line is that you seem to have the same approach to things, and I don’t share those views.

You would say that, Fern Mackenzie, being a realtor in Idaho:

http://www.sothebysrealty.com/AssociateProfile.aspx?R=300003111

Naturally, you’ll try to deny it.

But I also told you where I am from and that is easy to confirm, too. You’ll find me listed as a freelance researcher with the Library & Archives Canada. Want my SIN number, too?

See Rob, you seem to think the point is Kevin’s motivations. That’s your point, and most people who read here don’t care much for your points. They’re more interested, for example, in the fact that the gov’t is dishonest about its support for programs regarding climate change. Should there dishonesty be exposed or not? I’m no fan of the Liberals; I’m surprised to see you deflecting criticism of a political party.

You’re a supe-slueth Rob! You forgot to add that I also worked for Gordon Campbell and the BC Liberals, I was a bartender in university and my favorite color is purple. 

What’s your point exactly?

I think the Libs did a horrible job with Kyoto and climate reduction, and the Cons are doing just as poorly. 

Nobody here is trying to hide behind anonymity – it’s pretty easy to find out anything about anyone nowadays. Everybody is very up-front at DeSmog about their connections (your favourite colour is PURPLE?). Kevin may have supported a particular party, I had a Green Party sign up for the last election in Ontario (and MMP, too), but you won’t find us trying to bury that information to deceive anyone.

The point here is that John Baird is trying to put one over on us by suggesting these programs have anything to do with his government’s so-called commitment to controlling emissions. I know a thing or two about Baird – he was my MPP for awhile (look it up, Rob – I live near Ottawa, not Idaho). The guy is a loudmouthed jerk.

Hi Femack. I am a historical researcher also, in Calgary, and I will confess that I once voted for Mel Hurtig’s party because he published the Canadian Encyclopedia. :) I don’t want to give my name here because I don’t want some rightwing jerk pestering me or my family.

I know – there are lots of reasons for not posting your full name. I figure Rob is so busy blogging he doesn’t have time to harass a wee fish like me! It’s really only an issue because he makes such a big fuss about being Canadian. Frankly he gets far more attention than he deserves. Fern

[x]

This is a guest post by David Suzuki.

The Amazon rainforest is magnificent. Watching programs about it, we’re amazed by brilliant parrots and toucans, tapirs, anacondas and jaguars. But if you ever go there expecting to be overwhelmed by a dazzling blur of activity, you’ll be disappointed. The jungle has plenty of vegetation — hanging vines, enormous trees, bromeliads and more — and a cacophony of insects and frogs. But much of the activity goes on at night or high up in the canopy.

Films of tropical forests don’t accurately reflect the reality of the ecosystems....

read more