oil export

Mexico and American Oil Companies Want a Crude Swap to Open Loophole in the Oil Export Ban

As politicians from oil-producing states work to draw up bills to end the ban on oil exports, Mexican officials are “confident” that the country will soon be importing American crude through a backdoor loophole in the law.

Back in January, Mexico applied for a crude swap that, if approved, would allow the U.S. to export 100,000 barrels of oil per day to Mexico. This would be unrefined crude — refined products such as diesel and gasoline are not subject to the ban — likely from the Eagle Ford and Permian shale fields, where fracking has produced a glut of light, sweet crude in recent years.

Exporting Canada's Oil Means Exporting Canada's Jobs: Why the Enbridge Pipeline Threatens Canadian Economic Security

The arguments in favor of the Enbridge-proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline often stress the economic benefits the pipeline will bring to Canada. Economists and trade organizations emphasize the advantages of increased production in the tar sands for Albertans and the jobs produced during pipeline construction for British Columbians. Another supposed economic bonus is to come from strengthened trade relations with China, the largest foreign investor currently involved in Canada's tar sands.

Yet as the current National Energy Board hearing takes place, a new message is surfacing, and it's not of the 'economic boon' ilk. According to a number of analysts, energy experts and even industry players the pipeline will export more than just Canadian crude: it will also be shipping off Canadian jobs. And that, they say, coupled with China's growing stake in the tar sands, is by no means in Canada's long term economic interest.
 
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