Ed Davey

Tue, 2015-01-27 03:21Kyla Mandel
Kyla Mandel's picture

MPs Overwhelmingly Reject Moratorium on Fracking

Fracking lives to see another day in Britain as MPs overwhelmingly reject a proposal to place a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing for shale gas.

A mere 52 MPs voted in favour of the amendment to the controversial Infrastructure Bill yesterday. The vote follows a report released earlier that day by the cross-party House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee calling for a ban on fracking due to the risks it poses to Britain’s efforts to tackle climate change.

The amendment was voted down by 308 MPs including the Under Secretary of State at the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Amber Rudd, and DECC Secretary of State, Ed Davey, demonstrating their steadfast support of the nascent industry in face of rapidly mounting public and political opposition.

Thu, 2015-01-08 03:00Kyla Mandel
Kyla Mandel's picture

Davey Warns Paris Climate Deal ‘Won’t Be Ambitious Enough’

A new deal to tackle climate change expected to be agreed in Paris in December is unlikely to prevent dangerous climate change, energy secretary Ed Davey has warned.

Davey said he fears the climate talks will not secure ambitious enough commitments from political leaders to limit warming to 2°C, the temperature threshold which countries have agreed in attempt to prevent dangerous climate impacts such as drought, floods and sea level rise.

The objective for Paris is to keep the two degree limit within reach,” the secretary of state candidly told MPs on the parliamentary Energy and Climate Change Committee. “I am not expecting, with regret, the commitments we’ll see in the Paris agreement will get us to two degrees, unfortunately.”

Thu, 2015-01-01 00:01Richard Heasman
Richard Heasman's picture

Fracking in the UK: What to Expect in 2015

The current UK coalition government has overseen the greatest fossil fuel boom since the discovery of North Sea oil, but the controversy that surrounds shale has made it an interesting factor in the run-up to this year’s general election. Here’s what to expect.

More Fracking

The government has shown absolutely no evidence that it is willing to slow down its committed march towards the commercial development of shale gas.

For example, the House of Lords recently approved amendments to the infrastructure bill which, amidst heavy public resistance, will allow fracking companies to extract shale from right underneath people’s homes. This has since been quietly passed onto the House of Commons and gained its first reading on 20 November.

Mon, 2014-12-01 04:34Kyla Mandel
Kyla Mandel's picture

What Can We Expect From the Lima Climate Talks?

The pressure is on for leaders to move forward on climate change as delegates descend into Peru for the two-week UN climate change conference in Lima today.

Diplomats are calling these negotiations “the best chance in a generation of striking a deal on global warming” according to the Guardian, with the US and China’s commitment to work together on carbon pollution bringing fresh momentum.

There is some cautious optimism,” said Leo Hickman, WWF’s chief advisor on climate change. “Things feel different than they did six months ago, one year ago, so we don’t want to puncture that.”

Wed, 2012-12-05 10:36Steve Horn
Steve Horn's picture

Fracking Making Its Way Toward the UK

To date, opposition to hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) for unconventional oil and gas in the United Kingdom (UK) has been fierce. The opposition, though, seems to be meeting deaf ears in England, according to recent news reports. 

Bloomberg reported on Dec. 4 that England's Energy Secretary, Ed Davey, wants to lift the country's currently exisiting moratorium on fracking. The halt was put in place after drilling sites owned by Cuadrilla Resources caused two minor earthquakes in northwestern England in November 2011.

England's Chancellor of the Exchequer (a position equivalent to the Secretary of the Treasury in the United States), George Osborne, is set to release Britain's new energy plan on Dec. 5 and told Bloomberg he wants to ensure “Britain is not left behind” in the unconventional oil and gas boom.  

“Cuadrilla estimates that the area it is exploring in Lancashire, in northwestern England, could contain 200 trillion cubic feet of gas—more gas than all of Iraq,” explained Bloomberg. John Browne, the scandal-ridden former CEO of BP, sits as the Chairman of the Board of Directors of Cuadrilla. 

Osborne, The Independent recently reported, will also offer tax breaks to oil and gas corporations hungry to profit from England's shale gas prize. 

“Mr. Osborne hopes that tax breaks for shale gas extraction will encourage investors and help economic growth,” The Indepedent wrote. “Oil and gas are currently taxed at between 62 per cent and 81 per cent. Shale gas would be taxed at lower rates.”

An astounding 64-percent of the English countryside could soon be subject to fracking, which is over 34,000 square miles, according to The Independent

Subscribe to Ed Davey