george w bush

Just How Heavily Did ExxonMobil Edit a US EPA Climate Report?

Our latest DeSmog UK epic history post details the penetrating impact ExxonMobil had on US energy policy during the Bush era.

One year into US President George W. Bush’s reign and the fruits of ExxonMobil’s labours were already being felt.

The US had crippled Kyoto by pulling out of the global agreement and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) had lost its most outspoken communicator when Robert Watson was ousted by Bush at Exxon’s request.

George W Bush Elected President in 2000 'Floating on Oil Money'

This DeSmog UK epic history series post takes a closer look at ExxonMobil’s contribution to George W Bush’s election as President of the United States.

The 2000 US election cycle was as high stakes as they come. Congressional balance was in question, and the presidency was up for grabs.

The George W Bush–Dick Cheney partnership was Big Oil’s dream team. Bush, the presidential candidate, had made his early career though oil exploration in his home state of Texas, while Cheney, vice president (VP) candidate, was a Halliburton executive and ex-congressman of Wyoming, the US’s biggest coal producer.

How ExxonMobil Reacted When Environmentalists Crashed its First Annual Meeting 15 Years Ago

The DeSmog UK epic history series continues with a look at what happened when environmentalists attended an ExxonMobil meeting in Dallas, Texas.

ExxonMobil and other industry hardliners came together in 1998 to create an “Action Plan” to combat America’s growing fondness for fighting climate change.

This plan would provide a blueprint for undermining the climate movement over the next four years.

But, the environmentalists were well-organised. Having bought shares in ExxonMobil, they attended the corporation’s first annual meeting, held in Dallas in May 2000, and used it as a platform to attack Exxon boss Lee Raymond and the corporation’s policies.

What To Expect When You’re Electing: Mitt Romney’s Energy Advisors

In the last few months, the press has been drawing a lot of parallels between presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and former Republican President George W. Bush. And they have plenty of reasons for doing so. Romney has already tapped many of the same Bush economic and foreign policy advisers, and rumors were swirling earlier this year that Romney would tap Bush’s energy advisers as well.

As it turns out, those rumors are true.

Climate Progress has compiled a list of people who have been tapped, or will likely be tapped, by Romney for his energy team. The roster is a virtual “Dream Team” of dirty energy industry representatives from the coal industry, the shale gas industry, the oil industry, mountaintop removal mining companies, and lobbyists - all of whom were close advisers and friends of George W. Bush.

The most terrifying name on the list is American Petroleum Institute president Jack Gerard. Climate Progress points out that Gerard has been a longtime supporter of Romney, and that Romney considers Gerard a close, personal friend. Gerard’s stated goals, goals that we have to assume he’ll pressure Romney to fulfill, include placing an oil lobbyist in every district in America, opening up all federal lands for oil drilling, and removing many existing safety regulations.

Congress Says No To Free Climate Service

This week, the Republican-controlled U.S. House of Representatives sent a strong message to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – they’re not concerned about climate change. The NOAA had asked Congress for permission to create a new National Climate Service within the NOAA’s own offices, but Congress decided that the agency was just fine the way it is.

At a time when Congress is fiercely debating federal spending, it would seemingly make financial sense to deny additional funding to NOAA to create their new branch. But, in a rare occurrence on Capitol Hill, the new agency wouldn’t have cost anything, and NOAA didn’t ask for a single dime to fund their new venture, completely nullifying any financial argument against this common sense proposal.

The need for such an agency is completely justified, as The Washington Post points out:

Congress barred NOAA from launching what the agency bills as a “one-stop shop” for climate information.

Demand for such data is skyrocketing, NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco told Congress earlier this year. Farmers are wondering when to plant. Urban planners want to know whether groundwater will stop flowing under subdivisions. Insurance companies need climate data to help them set rates.

So if it wasn’t about money, then what would stop congressional Republicans from giving the OK to the organization? To put it bluntly, they don’t want scientists 'scaring' people with their creepy climate change mumbo jumbo.

Bush to Supreme Court: 'Shove it!'

The Bush administration has decided not to take any new steps to regulate greenhouse gas emissions before the president leaves office, despite pressure from the Supreme Court and broad accord among senior federal officials that new regulation is appropriate now.

Bush Press Secretary Dana Perino demands apology from Barbara Boxer

Earlier this week it was revealed that Vice President Dick Cheney's office deleted portions of Senate testimony to be given by Centers for Disease Control Director Julie Gerberding, on the public health impacts of climate change.

Today, Bush Press Secretary Dana Perino is demanding an apology from Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA) over comments she directed at Perino in regards to the climate censorship scandal.


Canada's Prime Minister Now Blames George Bush for Climate Inaction

Of all the people to jump on the Blame-Bush-Bandwagon, Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper is now claiming that,

… global efforts to fight climate change are likely to go more smoothly once U.S. President George W. Bush leaves office early next year.”

Yes, this is the same Prime Minister whose government was viewed as one of the lone instigators (along with the United States) of climate inaction at the last major round of international talks on climate change in Bali, Indonesia.

Bush, Burning

Well, everyone is teeing off on Bush's latest global warming speech–and no wonder.

I mean, it's pretty staggering when you think about it: The campaigning George W. Bush in the year 2000 was more progressive on this increasingly pressing issue than the lame duck George W. Bush in 2008.

The major news from Bush's speech, policy-wise, is that he said we'll “stop the growth of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 2025”–or, just under two decades from now. But everybody who knows anything about this issue knows that would amount to running a completely unacceptable risk.

Strike three on climate change for the Bush White House?

President Bush is set to make an announcement on climate change today.

Will it be a third strike for Bush?

Washington Post columnist Dan Froomkin thinks so:

Bush's trick on climate change is to wait until others are about to embrace mandatory limits on greenhouse gases, then make a major speech about goals and process, without any specifics on measures or penaltiesHis planned speech this afternoon recalls his two earlier attempts to muddy the debate and buy time.”DeSmog writer Chris Mooney is monitoring the announcement and will weigh in with his analysis later today.

UPDATE: And Strike Three, you're out Mr. President

Joe Romm at Climate Progress writes: Bush/Nero speech: “Technology, technology, blah, blah, let's fiddle until 2025

Dave Roberts at Grist writes: Same as it ever was

Andrew Revkin at the New York Times Dot Earth Blog marks up Bush's speech with his insights.

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