coal plant

Tue, 2014-03-11 21:20Ben Jervey
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Italian Judge: Coal Plant Caused Over 400 Deaths, Orders Shutdown

An Italian judge has ordered the shutdown of a coal-fired power plant that has been blamed for at least 442 deaths. Public prosecutors had argued that pollution from the plant in Italy’s Liguria region caused the premature deaths and between 1,700 - 2,000 cases of heart and lung disease.

On Tuesday, police followed the judge’s orders and shut down the two 330-Megawatt coal-fired units of the Vado Ligure plant. Francantonio Granero, the chief prosecutor in Savona, the government seat in Liguria, indicated in a February interview with United Press International that he was investigating the plant and its operators, Tirreno Power,  for “causing an environmental disaster and manslaughter.”

The judge, Fiorenza Giorgi, agreed with prosecutors that Tirreno Power hadn’t complied with emissions regulations, citing “negligent behavior” by the company and claiming that Tirreno’s emissions data was “unreliable.”

It is unclear whether Tirreno Power will be allowed to turn back on the coal-fired units if better emissions controls are implemented. The coal plants were built in 1971 and according to Savona prosecutors had emitted enough pollution to cause at least 442 premature deaths from 2000 to 2007. Investigators also found evidence that roughly 450 children were hospitalized with asthma and other respiratory ailments between 2005-2012, with the coal plant emissions to blame.

Fri, 2012-02-10 14:25Guest
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Salem Harbor Enforced Shutdown: The Beginning of the End for Old Coal in New England

This is a guest post by N. Jonathan Peress, VP and Director, Clean Energy and Climate Change, Conservation Law Foundation (CLF). It originally appeared on CLF's blog.

On February 6, 2003 then-Governor Mitt Romney stood in front of the Salem Harbor Power Plant in historic Salem Massachusetts and, while announcing that the plant would not be given additional time to comply with environmental regulations, said, “That Plant kills people.”

This week the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) and HealthLink secured an Order from the US District Court in Massachusetts requiring Salem Harbor power plant owner Dominion to shut down all four units at the 60-year-old coal-fired power plant by 2014. In bringing a clear end to the prolonged decline of Salem Harbor Station, this settlement ushers in a new era of clean air, clean water and clean energy for the community of Salem, MA, and for New England as a whole.

Mon, 2008-04-14 09:19Emily Murgatroyd
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The Mile Long Petition to Stop Coal

Take a minute today to sign the Appalachian Voice's “Mile Long Petition” to block the construction of a new coal plant in Virginia. Here's their cool petition widget:

Mon, 2007-12-03 10:15Kevin Grandia
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Washington State Rejects Coal Plant Over Global Warming Concerns

A Washington State panel has rejected plans for a 793-megawatt plant in Kalama, Cowlitz County, that would be fueled by coal or oil-refinery waste.

The coal plant was rejected on the grounds that it did not meet the State's new law that any new power plant must limit the amount of its global warming emissions to that of a highly efficient natural gas plant.

If a plant emits more than that, then it has to capture and sequester the extra emissions permanently.

Sustainablog has more. 

Thu, 2007-08-23 14:08Ross Gelbspan
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Is U.S. Outsourcing Its Own Destruction?

Residents of the Massachusetts town of Turners Falls celebrated when workers began tearing down a shuttered coal-fired power plant this year. But the demolition is hardly a victory in the battle against manmade climate change. Virtually every piece of the 2,600-ton plant is being shipped to Guatemala to be rebuilt.

It could continue to pollute, for another 50 years.

Sun, 2007-08-19 08:17Ross Gelbspan
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Outsourcing the Greenhouse

Turner's Falls, MA – Some townspeople in Turners Falls, this 19th-century mill village on the Connecticut River celebrated when workers began tearing down a shuttered coal-fired power plant this year.

First, they dismantled the towering boiler. 

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