Ohio State University

Thu, 2011-03-10 08:25Chris Mooney
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The Consequences of He Said, She Said Journalism

For a long time, those closely watching the climate debate unfold have denounced “he said, she said, we’re clueless” journalism, in which reporters present a “debate” between those who accept the science and those who do not, and leave it at that. Let the reader figure out who’s right, the philosophy seems to be. It’s journalistic “objectivity” not to “take sides”—right?

Those criticizing this approach—myself emphatically included—are working under a key assumption: If journalists would take a stand on matters of fact (such as whether global warming is caused by humans), rather than treating them as un-resolvable, the broader political discourse would also shift onto a firmer footing. That’s because we would move towards having a shared factual basis for making policy decisions, rather than fighting over the very reality upon which policy ought to be based.

It’s in this context that a new study (PDF) published in the Journal of Communication, would appear to break new ground–by actually examining the psychological effect that “he said, she said” or “passive” journalism has on readers, and in particular, on their views of whether it’s possible to discern the truth.

Wed, 2009-09-02 15:12Brendan DeMelle
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Protesters Outnumber Attendees At Ohio GOP ‘Energy Summit’

A ‘GOP Energy Summit’ held today at Ohio State University attracted more protesters outside than those attending the event hosted by Ohio Congressman Bob Latta inside a campus building. 

The summit, hosted by five Republican legislators, including several members of the GOP American Energy Solutions Group, was designed to “provide an opportunity to discuss the GOP’s American Energy Act,” a Republican ‘alternative bill’ that is virtually identical to the failed energy plan put forward under the Bush Administration.

ProgressOhio.org reports that over 50 protesters turned out to heckle the GOPers for their ‘stone age’ efforts to ignore the threat of climate change.

Fri, 2007-11-09 10:50Ross Gelbspan
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A Toast to the Skeptics -- With Saltwater Cocktails!

As sea levels rise, coastal communities could lose up to 50 percent more of their fresh water supplies than previously thought, according to a new study from Ohio State University.

Scientists previously assumed that, as saltwater moved inland, it would penetrate underground only as far as it did above ground. But new research shows that when saltwater and fresh water meet, a zone of mixed, or brackish, water can extend 50 percent further inland underground than it does above ground.

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