global warming blog

Fri, 2006-01-20 14:10Jim Hoggan
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Former EPA Chiefs Bash Bush

Six former chiefs of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, who gathered this week to celebrate the agency's 35th birthday, took some time off to bash the current administration for its myopic position on climate change.

“We need leadership, and I don't think we're getting it,” said Russell Train, EPA chief under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, talking about global warming. “To sit back and just push it away and say we'll deal with it sometime down the road is dishonest to the people and self-destructive.”

According to reports only  the current chief administrator stood up to defend President George W. Bush's record.
Fri, 2006-01-20 11:34Richard Littlemore
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Canada to Bail Out of Kyoto Agreement

Conservative Party Leader (and prime minister in waiting) Stephen Harper appeared to confirm last night in a CBC interview that he will remove Canada as a signatory to the Kyoto Agreement should he win election on Monday, Feb. 23, 2006.

Harper argues - rightly - that Canada wasted the last decade while the Liberal government of then-prime minister Jean Chretien dithered over how to achieve Kyoto targets. Chretien's biggest fear during the late '90s was that he would further alienate Albertans, whose robust economy rests heavily on fossil fuels. Chretien was also denied his usual ally in Ontario, as the then-Conservative provincial government refused to participate in any negotiations on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Tue, 2006-01-17 10:49Jim Hoggan
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Greenhouse Gas Emission Policy Revealed as a Sham

The Globe and Mail offers this report:

The automobile industry may be able to meet a highly touted, voluntary Kyoto agreement to curb greenhouse gas emissions without doing anything extra to improve the fuel efficiency of millions of cars on Canadian roads, a study by a U.S. researcher warns.”

Tue, 2006-01-17 08:16Richard Littlemore
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A Strenuously Balanced View on Climate Science

This New Scientist feature ( Climate change: Menace or myth?) is an older piece, missing some of the big news in the last year that has bolstered the scientific consensus yet further, but it is, nevertheless, a painstakingly fair effort to weigh the arguments for and against climate change - even giving the last word to ExxonMobil's client scientists.
Mon, 2006-01-16 09:38Jim Hoggan
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Temperature Rising in the Political Cortex

Fabulous, all-encompassing new climate change post on the blog, Political Cortex. Make sur
Sun, 2006-01-15 15:56Jim Hoggan
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The Australian: Any Sacrifice Worth Sitting at the Big Table

In a fact-bashing roundup, one of Australia's biggest newspapers has embarrassed itself in delighted support of the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate conference held there last week.

The Australian announced in this Editorial that climate change isn't proven; and that, if it is proven, it's too expensive to address by seeking an agreeable global mandate.
Fri, 2006-01-13 11:55Ross Gelbspan
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Global Warming: New Evidence for Blaming Plants

Watch the skeptics hop all over this one!

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute in Germany recently published findings indicating that plants are responsible for between 10 and 30 percent of the methane found in the atmosphere.

Methane is a major greenhouse gas. Far more powerful than carbon dioxide, it traps in more heat per molecule. The good news is that methane generally settles out within a matter of months - while CO2 stays up in the atmosphere for about 100 years.

Fri, 2006-01-13 11:05John Lefebvre

The Energy Industry is NOT Uniformly Evil

We at www.desmogblog.com have, perhaps, been a bit careless in villifying “the energy industry” and its role in sowing confusion in the debate over climate change.

In truth, the industry is anything but unanimous in its views on this matter. And far from deserving to be tarred with a stinky brush, good performers like BP Global, Royal Dutch Shell and, in Canada, Suncor, should get some credit.

Thu, 2006-01-12 10:11Ross Gelbspan
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The Fungus Among Us

J. Alan Pounds and 13 co-authors recently published a piece in the prestigious peer-reviewed journal, Nature, which concluded that global warming has likely caused the extinction of nearly 70 per cent of amphibian species in a mountainous region area of Central and South America. Pounds, an eminently respected researcher, heads up a conservation biology laboratory in Costa Rica.

His team concluded that the spread of the fungus that killed the frogs was due to global warming. Their conclusion is based on their finding that patterns of fungus outbreaks and extinctions in widely dispersed patches of habitat were synchronized in a way that could not be explained by chance or by local variations in weather conditions.

Wed, 2006-01-11 09:14Richard Littlemore
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The Perverse Pleasure of Breaking Records

Credit first to Gary Mason of the Globe and Mail, who in a Vancouver weather story on Jan. 10, 2006 offered this “old joke.”

A newcomer to Vancouver arrives and it's raining. He gets up the next day and it's still raining. It rains the day after that and the day after that. He goes for lunch five days later and it's still pouring. He sees a young boy walking down the street, and he says, “Does it every stop raining here?”

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