Mars

Mon, 2009-09-14 16:10Peter Sinclair
Peter Sinclair's picture

Climate Denial Crock of the Week/Mars Attacks Remixed

I’m remixing a number of the Climate Denial Crock of the Week videos, in order to address some comments viewers have had.

Number one, my sound mixing and quality have sometimes left something to be desired, and I’ve gotten some better equipment and more experience, so I can make them a lot easier to listen to.

Number two, people have asked for related URLs and sites they can go to, in order to follow up on arguments presented in the video, so I am doing that here.

The first-up remix is my debunking of the perennial denier favorite, ‘There’s Global Warming on Mars”, one of my favorites for content, and biggest embarrassments for sound….

Mon, 2009-01-19 09:51Jeremy Jacquot
Jeremy Jacquot's picture

Solar Forcing and Global Warming: Here We Go Again

Global warming skepticism knows no (planetary) bounds. The big scientific news of the week was the discovery of methane plumes rising from Mars’ surface. Because methane release on Earth is commonly associated with microbial digestion, NASA researchers believe the greenhouse gas could be a sign of life.

In a new paper published in the journal Science, Michael Mumma, the project’s lead scientist, hypothesizes that bacteria buried one to two miles below the red planet’s surface could be producing the plumes. The other possibility is that the gas is being generated by vulcanism or another geologic process – though that seems less likely since there has been no evidence of active volcanoes. This uncertainty, on top of recent warming trends, has led some to speculate that solar activity may be responsible for Martian climate change.

Thu, 2008-01-24 07:54Richard Littlemore
Richard Littlemore's picture

"Skeptical" Russian Scientist Blinded by Sunspots

Khabibullo Abdussamatov, head of a space research lab at the Pulkovo observatory in St. Petersburg, Russia, is arguing that global warming is over - and as proof, he reports that 2007 was one of the warmest years in recorded history. (The fact that this makes no sense was not explained in the story.)

In fact, NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (which provided the attached graph), points out that last year's high global average temperature occurred when “the equatorial Pacific Ocean [was] in the cool phase of its natural El Niño-La Niña cycle.”

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