elections

Mon, 2008-11-03 10:58Kevin Grandia
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Coal Booster McCain all spin no substance on job promises

One day to go and McCain (R-AZ) is re-branding himself the “coal booster” in a last ditch effort to pick up some support in coal States like Pennsylvania.

In a speech yesterday at the University of Scranton, PA, McCain stated that:

My friends, I’ve been a coal booster and it’s going to create jobs, and we’re going to export coal to other countries and we are going to create hundreds of thousands of jobs. That’s going to help restore the economy of the great state of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mon, 2008-10-20 00:26Jeremy Jacquot
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Round 3 of the Debates: Who Wants Energy Independence More?

In what proved to be a doozy of a debate – not so much for its substance as for its theatrics and sound bites (who will ever forget “Joe the Plumber”?) – the topic of climate change was again sadly, though not surprisingly, missing in action.

With the discussion once again focused mostly on domestic issues – the economy and healthcare looming large – the candidates spent most of the time pummeling each other on taxes, trade policies and education. Mercifully, moderator Bob Schieffer, a CBS News anchor, mostly managed to avoid inserting himself into the debate, save for occasionally pressing a candidate on a particular question (though I noticeably winced when he said the words “climate control”).

Wed, 2008-10-15 09:44Richard Littlemore
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Change your leaders: Take II

Congratulations today to Stephen Harper, who has convinced a critical plurality of Canadians that he is more capable of leading the country through difficult economic times than Liberal leader Stephane Dion would have been.

Returning to belligerent reality, however, it's clear that Canadians who care about climate change have their work cut out for them. In his excellent new book, Hot, Flat, and Crowded, the New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman says:

“It is much more important to change your leaders than your lightbulbs.”

Having passed up this opportunity to change our leaders, the only option now is for Canadians to get those leaders to change.

Thu, 2008-10-09 15:11Richard Littlemore
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Jack Layton: Captain of the team to re-elect Stephen Harper

If Conservative Party leader Stephen Harper is re-elected next week as Canadian prime minister, he will owe the biggest vote of gratitude to the New Democratic Party and its leader Jack Layton.

There has been comment enough about the lack-luster performance of Harper's most dangerous opponent, Liberal leader Stephane Dion, but the Liberals aren't losing this election because Dion lacks charisma. The Liberals are losing because the NDP has pushed tax-averse voters into Stephen Harper's lap.

Mon, 2008-10-06 02:38Mitchell Anderson
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Harper Government Suppresses Climate Report - Now Available Here

Although the Conservative government has argued that a critical Health Canada report on climate change impacts is “too large” to be made available online, the DeSmogBlog has sourced a copy that you can now access through these links.

The synopsis is available for download here - or you can opt for a copy of the entire report here.

The report warns of forest fires, drought, and increased deaths from smog, heat and disease - a grim scenario against which the Conservative government is taking virtually no action. In fact, the Harper government's principal reaction was to try to supress the report, now available only by snail mail, with delivery in “two to four weeks.”
Mon, 2008-09-29 15:51Richard Littlemore
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New DeSmog Site Clears Election Pollution

Go to Elections.Desmogblog.com for News and Analysis

Election fever has captured the U.S. and Canada simultaneously and the outcome of these two contests may affect the future of humankind more critically than any previous elections in this history of either country.

Given the recent (i.e. George Bush-induced) climate policy in the United States, U.S. voters are choosing between one candidate (John McCain)who is better than the last guy and one who may actually show leadership on this, the most important environmental issue in human history.

The situation is more clear cut - if more dire - in Canada. Four of the five credible party leaders have climate change platforms that would take Canada off the list of greedy nations that put their own short-term profits ahead of global environmental safety. But one leader, current Conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper, has made it clear that his most important constituents are the people who want unfettered rights to develop the tar sands - environmental consequences be damned.
Mon, 2008-09-29 08:34Richard Littlemore
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Canadian Science Book Crosses Boldly into Politics

“For Canadians, this is the best single book on our climate crisis and what we should do about it.” 

Thomas Homer-Dixon on Andrew Weaver's Keeping Our Cool

University of Victoria climatologist Dr. Andrew Weaver, Canada's answer to James Hansen, continues to win rave reviews and political attention for his new book, Keeping Our Cool.

Weaver has been outspoken about the sorry record of Canada's current Conservative government (“They were making policy without even consulting their environmental scientists.”) and highly critical of the government's efforts to muzzle those in the scientific community (“It’s absolutely Orwellian what’s going on here in science in Canada.”)

Fri, 2008-09-26 17:42Jeremy Jacquot
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Obama vs. McCain: Where Do the Candidates Stand on Science Issues?

Prying answers out of the candidates about science-related issues this electoral season has proven almost as challenging as prying interviews out of Sarah Palin, McCain's elusive running mate. Aside from an early focus on the candidates' respective energy policies (see: their positions on offshore drilling), the press has shown relatively little interest in scrutinizing Obama's and McCain's views on matters of science.

Even the once controversial issue of stem cell biology, which, alongside gay marriage, helped mobilize the conservative base for George W. Bush during the 2004 election, has received little shrift this time around.

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