arctic warming

Tue, 2011-01-18 14:12Richard Littlemore
Richard Littlemore's picture

"The silver lining to Arctic global warming" - Seriously?

Whenever I see a headline like the one quoted above, I always go searching for some hint of irony in the story. Woefully, London’s Telegraph doesn’t do irony.

Rather, Tele contributor Roger Howard asserts with grave conviction that while climate change is “unmistakable,” while its effects are “depressing and disturbing,” that it’s great to see the Arctic ice melting because now BP - that paragon of responsible environmental stewardship - can get into bed with the Russian oil giant, Rosneft.

It’s as though the resident of a burning house, madly in search of a fire extinguisher, stops to celebrate instead the discovery of another pack of matches. “Oh goody! Climate change is bad, but the ‘silver lining’ is that now two of the biggest climate culprits on the planet can work together to make it worse.”

Seriously.

Wed, 2008-12-17 16:04Page van der Linden
Page van der Linden's picture

Has Arctic sea ice loss become irreversible?

The party’s over, we had us a time..
We burned all the kindling…
Watched the last coals dwindling
And the ice melting down…

Eliza Gilkyson

 

Is the party over?

According to a new study by scientists at the NSICD (National Snow and Ice Data Centre), there’s a good chance that Arctic sea ice has melted beyond the point of no return.

Joseph Romm points us to a story in today’s edition of the UK’s Independent.  The news is not good:

Scientists have found the first unequivocal evidence that the Arctic region is warming at a faster rate than the rest of the world at least a decade before it was predicted to happen.

Climate-change researchers have found that air temperatures in the region are higher than would be normally expected during the autumn because the increased melting of the summer Arctic sea ice is accumulating heat in the ocean. The phenomenon, known as Arctic amplification, was not expected to be seen for at least another 10 or 15 years and the findings will further raise concerns that the Arctic has already passed the climatic tipping-point towards ice-free summers, beyond which it may not recover.

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