NASA

Sun, 2008-11-23 14:18Mitchell Anderson
Mitchell Anderson's picture

DesmogBlog Breaks DSCOVR Story in Nature

DesmogBlog was contacted this month by Nature – the most prestigious science journal in the world  – about our latest posting on the Deep Space Climate Observatory

It seems their editors were interested in the news we broke that the Air Force was considering launching this $100 million mothballed spacecraft – minus the Earth observing instruments.

Last week they published an 800 word article based on information we provided to them about this bizarre story.

Alas, our extensive research on the DSCOVR mission was not mentioned in the Nature article, but such is the lot of a blogger.

More importantly, the exposure provided by this piece in one of the premier journals in the world will hopefully light a fire under NASA to not to kill this vital mission.

Wed, 2008-10-29 16:44Mitchell Anderson
Mitchell Anderson's picture

DSCOVR Mission May Be Gutted

Here is the latest twist in the bizarre story about the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR). Apparently, the US Air Force is in discussions with NASA to take over the mission, with one important catch: that all the Earth observing instruments be removed.

It seems the Air Force is more interested in looking at the Sun than our warming planet and plans are being made to send the spacecraft one million miles distant – only to look the other way.

Tue, 2008-09-02 09:58Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

Check out NASA's new science blog

When it comes to climate science, its usually best to talk to climate scientists. And a new blog set up by NASA at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is a welcomed voice in the social media arena.

While climate isn't the only focus of the new JPL blog, so far there has been a pretty heavy focus on the issue. So grab the JPL blog's RSS feed and keep up-to-date on the latest in climate change science through the eyes of an actual climate scientist. 

Fri, 2008-08-01 10:43Richard Littlemore
Richard Littlemore's picture

ClimateAudit Endorses 1988 Climate Change Projections

Next to the much-(and usually falsely)-maligned hockey stick graph, one of the denier community's favorite targets has been a series of climate modeling graphs that NASA's James Hansen produced in 1988.

Notwithstanding that Hansen has done two more decades of world-leading research, people like Stephen McIntyre of the quibbler site ClimateAudit.Org have obsessed endlessly about the purported “flaws” in that graph series.

Which is why it's so surprising to see McIntyre accepting Hansen's work now.

Fri, 2008-07-25 22:06Emily Murgatroyd
Emily Murgatroyd's picture

Where's the best place for wind power?

Generating electricity from the power of the wind is one of the many ways we can begin to wean North America off its reliance on dirty fuels like coal that produce massive amounts of heat-trapping greenhouse gas.

So where are the windiest places in the world that can power our lives?

NASA scientists have been creating maps using nearly a decade of data from NASA's QuikScat satellite that reveal ocean areas where winds could produce energy.

Fri, 2008-07-25 15:06Richard Littlemore
Richard Littlemore's picture

Lorne Gunter: Incompetent or Lying? Either Way, Worth Firing

An earlier post of the errors/misrepresentations in a recent Lorne Gunter column in the National Post has attracted a host of comments and a few that further debunk Gunter’s passionately inaccurate talking points.

DeSmog reader Dave Clark, for example, offers this:

Yet another whopper from Gunter:

Thu, 2008-06-05 13:07Mitchell Anderson
Mitchell Anderson's picture

Whitehouse Slammed in New York Times Editorial

The Bush administration’s efforts to manipulate climate science took another hit this week. The New York Times ran a editorial highlighting the damning report just issued by The Inspector General of NASA showing that political appointees from the Whitehouse were apparently massaging the messaging around climate science.

The New York Times was not amused: “The Bush administration has worked overtime to manipulate or conceal scientific evidence — and muzzled at least one prominent scientist — to justify its failure to address climate change.”
Mon, 2008-06-02 17:28Mitchell Anderson
Mitchell Anderson's picture

NASA Slammed for Fudging Climate Science

A scathing report from NASA this week slammed their own PR department for systematically misleading the public on climate science.

The Inspector General of NASA penned the investigation in response to a complaint by fourteen US Senators, alleging that NASA was colluding with the White House to downplay the known dangers of climate change. Specifically, the Senators wanted NASAto conduct a full and thorough investigation into the suppression of science and censorship of scientists at [NASA].”


Thu, 2008-05-22 19:00Mitchell Anderson
Mitchell Anderson's picture

Congress Orders NASA to Deal With DSCOVR

In a stunning break from years of inaction, the US Congress has tabled legislation ordering NASA to finally deal with the critically important Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2008 was submitted last week to the House of Representatives. Section 207 of this Act is plainly entitled: “Plan For Disposition Of Deep Space Climate Observatory.

If this Act becomes law, NASA must finally cough up some answers on why this vital piece of space hardware has been sitting in a box for the last seven years.

Fri, 2008-04-18 10:36Mitchell Anderson
Mitchell Anderson's picture

Did NASA Mislead the Media About the DSCOVR Climate Project?

New information provided by inside sources to DeSmogBlog raises questions about public statements from NASA when asked by the media about the cost of launching Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).

The date was January 24, 2008. Four NASA senior brass had just finished delivering a rambling one hour news briefing on their much-maligned Earth sciences program - noteworthy only in that there was no news. No new announcements. No new missions.

Seth Borenstein, the science reporter for Associated Press rose to ask the first question, specifically about why NASA had not launched DSCOVR.

Pages

Subscribe to NASA