coal mines

China Will Close 1,000 Coal Mines As Industry Continues to Sputter

China has announced plans to close more than 1,000 coal mines in 2016, cutting production by 60 million tonnes. The move is part of a larger mandate to eliminate as much as 500 million tonnes of surplus production over the next five years, the government says. 
 
When it comes to coal, China is king: it is the world's largest producer and also its largest consumer. Last year, the country's 10,760 mines produced 3.7 million tonnes of coal. Yet, it's estimated that over half (2 million tonnes) that capacity does not get used, every year. According to a Reuters report, demand has waned due to the combination of a slowing economy and government policy to curb pollution by moving away from fossil fuels.
 
In addition to the air pollution from burning coal that plagues Chinese cities and exacts huge costs on society, the country's coal mining over-production is a real problem. Last year the country's supply surplus drove domestic prices down by a third.  Prices have dropped for five straight years thanks to a glutted market. Recognizing one of its most important economic sectors is in trouble, China hopes to stimulate the industry through consolidation.  The government has plans to eventually shut down all mines that produce less than 90,000 tonnes per year. Under this policy 5,600 mines will be shuttered.

Dogwood Initiative Exposes BC's Dirty Coal Export Secret

British Columbia plays a special role in the pollution and warming of the atmosphere, according a new report from the Dogwood Initiative on BC’s rapidly expanding coal industry and its implications for the province’s contributions to climate disruption. 

The BC government plans to reduce emissions by 33 percent from 2007 levels by 2020. Yet BC is preparing to emit more than its fair share of climate threatening pollution due to the province’s steady increase in coal production and export.

As the Dogwood Initiative report shows, BC is outsourcing more than just dirty energy: the province’s carbon emissions are nearly doubled when you factor in BC coal burnt in other countries.

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