LNG Exports

Natural Gas Exports: Executive Summary

Co-authored by Lee Fang and Steve Horn.

Executive Summary

The 2014 U.S. congressional mid-term elections are now complete, and the Republican Party controls both the House of Representatives and the Senate. Some have forecasted that this could have catastrophic impacts for progress on climate change and environmental protection in general.

Natural Gas Exports: Key Findings

Key Findings 

The Obama Administration and Key Democratic Leaders Increasingly Embrace LNG Interests: While the Obama White House and Democratic Party have presented themselves as leaders in addressing climate change, moving away from fossil fuels and toward alternative energy sources, LNG exporters have bought their way into the Democratic Party, securing a close relationship with the White House, key federal agencies, and Democratic Party leaders.

Natural Gas Exports: Democrats and the Obama Administration

Democrats and the Obama Administration

President Obama came into office pledging to tackle climate change and to “close the revolving door” between lobbyists and government. But as the LNG debate has unfolded, the administration has broken both promises.

Natural Gas Exports: Our Energy Moment

Message as Massage: “Our Energy Moment”

The rush to hire Democrats for LNG export promotion has raised the specter of conflicts of interest for the White House and its allies.

Natural Gas Exports: Bush Administration Aides and LNG

Bush Administration Aides and LNG

Many ex-Bush Administration officials have passed through the government-industry revolving door and now lobby for or directly own key LNG industry assets.

Natural Gas Exports: Congress

 Congress 

When lawmakers convened for the annual Congressional Baseball Game for Charity in July 2014, they were greeted with packets reminding them of the event’s sponsors: Cheniere, the LNG firm that was the first to win an export license from the federal government, and ANGA, the lobbying association pushing for more exports.

Natural Gas Exports: Koch Brothers and the Conservative Echo Chamber

Koch Brothers and the Conservative Echo Chamber

The “Kochtopus” tentacles reach into the LNG exports debate as well.

Sun, 2014-10-26 22:45Steve Horn
Steve Horn's picture

Drilling Deeper: New Report Casts Doubt on Fracking Production Numbers

Post Carbon Institute has published a report and multiple related resources calling into question the production statistics touted by promoters of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”)

By calculating the production numbers on a well-by-well basis for shale gas and tight oil fields throughout the U.S., Post Carbon concludes that the future of fracking is not nearly as bright as industry cheerleaders suggest. The report, “Drilling Deeper: A Reality Check on U.S. Government Forecasts for a Lasting Tight Oil & Shale Gas Boom,” authored by Post Carbon fellow J. David Hughes, updates an earlier report he authored for Post Carbon in 2012.

Hughes analyzed the production stats for seven tight oil basins and seven gas basins, which account for 88-percent and 89-percent of current shale gas production.

Among the key findings: 

-By 2040, production rates from the Bakken Shale and Eagle Ford Shale will be less than a tenth of that projected by the Energy Department. For the top three shale gas fields — the Marcellus Shale, Eagle Ford and Bakken — production rates from these plays will be about a third of the EIA forecast.

-The three year average well decline rates for the seven shale oil basins measured for the report range from an astounding 60-percent to 91-percent. That means over those three years, the amount of oil coming out of the wells decreases by that percentage. This translates to 43-percent to 64-percent of their estimated ultimate recovery dug out during the first three years of the well's existence.

-Four of the seven shale gas basins are already in terminal decline in terms of their well productivity: the Haynesville Shale, Fayetteville Shale, Woodford Shale and Barnett Shale.

-The three year average well decline rates for the seven shale gas basins measured for the report ranges between 74-percent to 82-percent. 

-The average annual decline rates in the seven shale gas basins examined equals between 23-percent and 49-percent. Translation: between one-quarter and one-half of all production in each basin must be replaced annually just to keep running at the same pace on the drilling treadmill and keep getting the same amount of gas out of the earth.

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