global warming

NOAA vs. NASA hottest year in the US still officially 1998

No offense to NASA, but as far as maintaining the official US surface temperature records, it's the job of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

And according to the official NOAA records, the 10 hottest years begin with 1998, followed by 2006.

But according to recent histrionics from the climate change denial industry, 1998 is no longer the hottest year in the US, it's 1934.

DeSmogBlog welcomes Mitchell Anderson to the investigative team

The DeSmogBlog team welcomes writer and researcher Mitchell Anderson to the team.

Over the next few months Mitchell will be writing an investigative series on the US administration's mothballing of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).

Both Democrats and Republicans bend over for King Coal, but Bush administration bends further

The U.S. Interior Department last week proposed new regulations aimed at permanently legalizing high-altitude strip mining of coal, a ruthless process that has thus far ruined 1,200 miles of streams and hundreds of square miles of forests. Due to the financial might of the coal industry, neither Democratic nor Republican administrations have made a serious effort to curb this serial decapitation of Appalachian coal seams, but the Bush people have been especially resourceful in perpetuating it.

Jacoby's questionable column is chopped liver

Here's a nice little retort of Jeff Jacoby's head-in-the-sand rant last week that in his mind somehow proves that human-caused global warming is not a reality. Taking opinion as some type of scientific evidence, the Boston Globe columnist wrote that, “scientists and other 'serious people' who question the global warming disaster narrative are not hard to find,”

In response David Bernstein at the Phoenix Sun writes:

In the August 19 Boston Globe, conservative op-ed contributor Jeff Jacoby wrote his fifth column in eight months denying climate change. His disdain for warming theorists goes back much longer; he pontificated on the subject as far back as 2002. And yet, after all this time and effort, he’s still relying on thin gruel for source material.”

Fun with Wiki Scanner! Senate and Congress wiki revisions

Last week I highlighted a brilliant piece of programming called Wiki Scanner, which cross-reference known IP addresses with revisions to Wikipedia entries.

For example, an astute Wiki Scanner found that someone using a computer with an ExxonMobil IP address revised the entry for the Valdez oil spill. Whoever was using the ExxonMobil IP address edited the Valdez entry in a way that downplayed the environmental devastation it caused.

So here's some interesting things we've been able to find so far using Wiki Scanner:

White House set to expand mountaintop coal mining

The Bush administration is expected to issue a regulation Friday to enshrine the coal mining practice of mountaintop removal, which involves blasting off the tops of mountains and dumping the rubble into valleys and streams. Apart from a multiplicity of other forms of environmental degradation, use of the technique will expand dependence on coal, the largest source of atmospheric CO2, and slow conversion from fossil to renewable fuels.

China's harvests face decimation due to global warming

China, the world’s most populous nation as well as its biggest greenhouse-gas emitter, is forecast to experience as much as a 10 per cent cut in its annual grain harvest due to global warming.

Court orders Bush administration to prepare global-warming documents

In a case brought by environmentalists, a U.S. court has ruled the White House broke the law by failing to prepare studies and plans for dealing with climate change, and ordered the administration to produce the required documents by early next year.

Big Oil's in the House! (and the Senate)

The Center for American Progress has released a report cross-referencing oil and gas political donations with voting activity on a recent clean energy bill passed in the House of Representatives.

And surprise of all surprises they found that the more money a member of Congress received from the oil industry the more likely they were to vote against the bill which eliminates $16 billion worth of tax loopholes to oil companies. The $16 billion is earmarked for investment in the development on clean energy technologies like wind and solar power.

Interval measures - Part 5 of "Ew, I just stepped in a Heartland study!"

This is part 4 in a series on the Heartland Institute's supposedly rigorous study (pdf) on the state of global warming science. This flawed paper has been distributed to 10,000 Utahns by the Utah-based Sutherland Institute, a “sister” of the Heartland Institute.

Paul T. Mero, the president of the Sutherland Institute claims that, “for skeptics, we went out of our way to include a special analysis of the methodology used to create this study. This report is an honest reflection of the international scientific community…”

Let's see how that holds up.

Flaw #1: Heartland's study makes incorrect assumptions about levels of agreement and disagreement

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