climate change

U.S. hosts climate-change conference and promptly digs in its heels

The meeting began just two days after a United Nations gathering aimed at finding agreement on binding limits on greenhouse-gas emissions, which the U.S. and Canada have opposed. While U.S. officials insist the latest conference was not designed to undercut UN efforts, opening remarks heralded a collision course between the Bush Administration and other world leaders seeking tough new standards to succeed the Kyoto Protocol when it expires in 2012.

Nordhaus and Shellenberger: Overselling the Right Message

You probably heard already: The “Death of Environmentalism” guys are back, once again explaining the follies of the green movement.

Their new book, Break Through , has created a lot of chatter with its argument that enviros are too darn pessimistic, and repeatedly shoot themselves in the foot with command-and-control regulatory thinking and doom and gloom talking.

New poll: 68% of Americans support aggressive international climate treaty

A poll released today by the Yale Project on Climate Change and its partners finds that 68 percent of Americans support a new international treaty requiring the United States to cut its emissions of carbon dioxide 90 percent by the year 2050.

If you like this story, please feel free to vote for it at Digg.com here and Hugg.com here and help us spread the word. Thanks!

Video: Not even Bush, Harper and Howard can Spin Mother Nature

No matter how much George W Bush, Australian Prime Minister John Howard and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper talk, the bottom line is that mother nature isn't listening.

If you like this video, please vote for it on Digg.com here and Hugg.com here and help us get the message out.

George W Bush's Global Warming Policy History

Reuters has just released a timeline of Bush's evolving policy on climate change.

Did you know that Bush did not mention global warming, the greatest environmental threat to our planet ever, in a State of the Union address until January, 2007.

Guess it stands to reason, considering he didn't actually recognize that “an increase in greenhouse gases caused by humans is contributing to the problem,” until July 2005.

Cutting to the Chase on Capitol Hill Climate Change Plans

The good news is that there's all sorts of proposed action on climate change bouncing around Capitol Hill right now. The bad news is that there's all sorts of proposed action on climate change bouncing around Capital Hill right now, making things more than a tad confusing.

So whose plan is the most aggressive and whose plan is nothing more than hot air?

Check this amazingly simple chart produced by the fine folks at the World Resource Institute, for a comparison of the various climate change bills and their effect on carbon emissions out to the year 2050.

The winner on overall reductions according to this chart would be the bill being proposed jointly by Sanders-Boxer and Waxman. And the biggest loser is the bill being proposed by Bingaman and Specter.

Most people now believe man is causing global warming

A new survey has found growing global awareness of man’s role in climate change, together with a sense of urgency around curbing greenhouse-gas emissions. The challenge now is to get world leaders to take the necessary action.

Bush Administration Comes Unraveled Around the Climate Issue

Even as President Bush tries to sabotage California's proposed auto mileage standards, U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said the world needs a revolution in energy that transcends oil, gas and coal to prevent problems from climate change.

The Administration's position on climate change has become increasingly muddled – with the President telling large Asian emitters they will need only to cut their “energy intensity” 25 percent by 2050, even as John Marburger, the President's Science Adviser declared that climate change is “man made.” He made that statement around the same time a federal judge rebuked the Bush Administration for refusing to release the National Assessment on the impacts of climate change in the US.

Canada’s Harper evokes ‘F-word,’ touts technology at UN summit

The prime minister’s call for flexibility at the largest-ever political summit on climate change held firm with the Conservative government's opposition to a UN-driven push for short-term binding targets, and its preference for goals that have less economic impact. Not to worry, though, technology will save the day.

Federal report scorns Canada's climate-change plan for exaggerating carbon cuts

A government-appointed advisory panel says in a 38-page report the Harper administration has gone too far in estimating the potential results of its global warming strategy. The group also said the government's plan is vague and uses questionable accounting methods. The report comes as the Conservative government is being sued by green groups for its foor-dragging.

Pages

Subscribe to climate change