Energy Shift Requires Shift In Conversation

This is a guest post by David Suzuki.

Abundant, cheap fossil fuels have driven explosive technological, industrial and economic expansion for more than a century. The pervasive infrastructure developed to accommodate this growth makes it difficult to contemplate rapidly shifting away from coal, oil and gas, which creates a psychological barrier to rational discourse on energy issues.

The ecological and true economic costs of energy use force us to scrutinize our way of living. And because our infrastructure doesn’t allow us to entirely avoid fossil fuels, we must face the contradiction between how we should live and constraints against doing so.

Canada has no national energy plan, other than governmental desire to be a fossil-fuelled energy-export superpower. Given the consequences of human-induced climate change already hitting home, you’d think the highest priority of governments at all levels would be to decide on the lowest-emission energy path. But politicians focused on election intervals have difficulty dealing with generational issues.

Global warming heralds lower timber values and shorter logging seasons in New Hampshire

Experts say climate change can also increase the number of insects and have serious impact on tourism and maple syrup production in the “Live Free or Die” state.

Rob Scagel

Rob K Scagel


  • M.Sc. (Botany). [1]


Rob Scagel is listed as the “principal consultant” for a company called Pacific Phytometric Consultants based in Surrey, BC, Canada.

Numerous sources describe Scagel as a “forest microclimate specialist.”

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