Wed, 2014-12-31 06:00Julie Dermansky
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2014 Year in Review: Photos of All Things Fracking Related

The oil and gas fracking industry continues to change America's physical and political landscape. Falling oil and gas prices have threatened to stall the industry's production growth, but for now, new drill sites continue to spring up. It was a very eventful year for both the industry and its critics. Here is my look back at some of the most notable stories and photographs.

In 2014, The Post Carbon Institute and the University of Texas released reports finding the Energy Information Administration's projections of the fracking boom’s production potential greatly inflated. 

Numerous peer-reviewed studies have been published that hold the fracking industry responsible for water and air contamination. And health studies have connected industry emissions to negative health effects impacting those living near fracking sites.

Despite the fracking industry's continued growth, the anti-fracking movement claimed numerous victories in 2014. The most high profile victories: Denton, Texas voters passed a referendum banning fracking in their city, and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo issued a statewide fracking ban after his health commissioner's report concluded that the health risks are too great.

Meanwhile, America's export policy on liquefied natural gas (LNG) is loosening and the federal government will streamline permits for frack sites on public lands overseen by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), a unit of the U.S. Department of Interior.

DeSmog Fracking Coverage in 2014

Here are some selected stories covered by DeSmogBlog on the fracking industry in 2014:

Tue, 2014-12-30 12:35Mike Gaworecki
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Top 5 Clean Energy Revolution Stories of 2014

The steady march of renewable energy, primarily wind and solar, toward mainstream usage continued apace in 2014.

Here are the top 5 clean energy revolution stories in the U.S. this year:

Mon, 2014-12-29 04:00Julie Dermansky
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Theo Colborn’s Legacy Will Be Kept Alive By TEDX

Dr. Theo Colborn, founder of the Endocrine Disruption Exchange (TEDX), died on December 14, 2014. For nearly 30 years, she studied the effects that chemicals used in the fossil fuel industry have on the endocrine system, producing groundbreaking work on the subject.

The Endocrine Disruption Exchange (TEDX), founded in 2003, compiles and disseminates scientific evidence on human health and environmental problems caused by low-dose and/or ambient exposure to chemicals that interfere with development and function, called endocrine disruptors.

Colborn's work from the last decade connects exposure to emissions from oil and gas development to damage done to the health of humans and animals.

What most people don't know when we poke a hole in the ground, when the methane and natural gas comes up, it comes up with what I call ‘hitchhikers’ — very dangerous toxic chemicals. And to date they have been ignored by those who are responsible for protecting our health,” Colborn said during a September interview part of which was used in a video produced by Earthworks, an environmental advocacy organization.


Theo Colborn during an interview with Earthworks in September 2014. © Julie Dermansky for Earthworks

Fri, 2014-12-26 18:31Mike De Souza
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Canadian Government: This Reporter's Question About ALEC 'Undeserving of Response'

ALEC light brigading

This article is re-published with permission from mikedesouza.com

As some of you may know, I’ll be starting a new role in January 2015 as an investigative resources correspondent for Reuters.

Getting access to records about government decisions and policies has long played a key role in the work of many journalists around the world. It will also be a key element for me in the weeks, months and years to come.

So to end off 2014, here are a few examples of some of my recent experiences with government efforts to either release or hide information.

Canada’s information watchdog has noted that the Supreme Court of Canada recognizes access to information as a quasi-constitutional right of all Canadians.

Obtaining access to information is an extension of freedom of expression since it allows the population to be informed and speak about government policies and decisions on how these governments spend public money.

Wed, 2014-12-24 15:00Julie Dermansky
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Christmas Parade in the Shadow of an Oil Refinery

The city of Norco, Louisiana, 25 miles from New Orleans, held its annual Christmas parade on December 7th. It is situated on the east bank of the Mississippi River, along the stretch between Baton Rouge and New Orleans that is known to some as “The Petrochemical Corridor” and to others as “Cancer Alley.”

The parade departed from River Road after Santa Claus arrived via helicopter, landing on the levee. A crowd lined Main Street to watch the parade and collect plastic beads and toys thrown from the floats and marchers passing by.

The parade’s backdrop, Shell’s chemical plant and Motiva’s refinery, was a reminder of our relationship to fossil fuels.

Those who live in communities like Norco may benefit from a new rule the Environmental Protection Agency will release in April 2015 in accordance with a consent decree approved by a federal judge earlier this year.

Implementation of the proposed rule “will result in project reductions of 1.760 tons per year of hazardous air pollutants, which will reduce cancer risk and chronic health effects,” according to the EPA.

Here are photos of the parade and a holiday video shot in Norco last year. 

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