Bank of England Says Climate Change Research 'Absolutely Essential' After Attack From Climate Denier Lord Lawson

Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England, hit back against climate denier Lord Nigel Lawson's accusation that the Bank had its priorities wrong by researching the impact of climate change in the insurance industry.

Speaking in the House of Lords' Economic Select Committee yesterday, Lawson said there were many issues in the banking industry, so “wouldn’t it be better if you focused your attention on those instead of engaging in green claptrap?”

Carney, however, robustly defended the Bank’s work, stating: “In the insurance business one of the top risks is climate change. Understanding those risks… is absolutely essential to discharge our responsibilities to oversee and supervise the third largest insurance market in the world.”

How the IPCC Appointed a Dynamic New Leader 20 Years Ago Against Growing Sceptic Opposition

Our latest DeSmog UK epic history post looks at how the dynamic Professor Bob Watson (pictured) became chairman of the IPCC in 1997 amidst a groundswell of political activity.

Michael Mann’s submersion into climate research coincided with a global groundswell. In 1993, he set about trying to establish when the global temperatures had last risen so high or so rapidly.

Two years later, in December 1995, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) completed its second major report and published it during the first weeks of the following year.

Florida’s War on Words 'Climate Change' Will Doom The Sunshine State

Officials in the state of Florida are finally taking action against climate change. They have declared war on global warming. They are taking a firm stand and making bold actions to finally end the threat of climate change.

But before you get too excited, we aren’t talking about the climate change that threatens our coastlines, water supplies, or agriculture. We’re talking about the actual language used to describe these events.

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is no longer allowed to use the terms “climate change” or “global warming” in official correspondence. The Florida Center for Investigative Reporting (FCIR) spoke with former DEP officials who told the agency that the department was forbidden from using those terms when any official communication from the agency. They were also not allowed to use the word “sustainability,” according to the FCIR.

Booming U.S. Renewable Energy Sector Growing Faster Than Expected

The mainstreaming of renewable energy is happening even faster than projected.

According to the latest “Electric Power Monthly” report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, which includes data through the end of 2014, some 13.91% of electricity generation in the U.S. last year was from renewable sources.

“Given current growth rates, especially for solar and wind, it is quite possible that renewable energy sources will reach, or exceed, 14% of the nation's electrical supply by the end of 2015,” noted Ken Bossong, executive director of the SUN DAY Campaign. “That is a level that EIA, only a few years ago, was forecasting would not be achieved until the year 2040.”

That number includes conventional hydroelectric power, which comes with severe environmental impacts of its own and is not generally considered a true “clean energy” source (the same can be said of biomass and biofuels, which is also included). So it’s worth noting that 2014 was the first year that electricity generation from non-hydropower renewable energy sources exceeded hydroelectric generation.

Wind energy continues to be the biggest clean energy source by far, supplying some 4.45% of 2014 electricity generation in the U.S. versus .45% from solar and .41% from geothermal. But solar is making great strides, seeing more than 100% growth last year while wind grew just 8.3% and geothermal by just 5.4%.

Climate Change is Creating a New Battleground as Nations Increase Arctic Military Presence

Commanders of Russia’s Northern Fleet recently held a competition to see who could orchestrate the best torpedo attack.

Submarine forces battled it out in sub-zero temperatures at the fleet’s main base in Gadzhiyevo, near Murmansk: the north-west tip of Russia along the Finnish border and the Barents Sea. Winners received the Northern Fleet Commander’s prize.

This was the culmination of Arctic training exercises which focused not only on torpedoes but also mines, anti-mine weapons, anti-submarine weapons and electronic warfare. Special attention was given to using torpedoes to open ice to allow submarines to surface and launch missiles.

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