Thu, 2007-05-17 09:26Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Broad coalition of cities and banks pledge billions to curb carbon emissions

The assembly of 16 of the world’s largest cities and five banks also includes ex-President Bill Clinton, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and several corporations. Under the plan, developed through the William J. Clinton Foundation, participating banks would provide up to $1 billion each in loans to cities or private landlords to upgrade energy-hungry heating, cooling and lighting systems in older buildings.

Thu, 2007-05-17 08:51Richard Littlemore
Richard Littlemore's picture

Pssst! Wanna Buy a Cheap, Inefficient, Illegal Lightbulb

Hide your children: the dim bulbs at the Natural Resources Stewardship Project (NRSP) are warning that the federal ban on incandescent lightbulbs could soon give rise to a black market in inefficient lighting.

Imagine, Tim Ball and Tom Harris , decked out in bulky coats and lurking in the alleyways of Toronto and Victoria, offering addicts the opportunty to burn four to six times as much energy with a single lightbulb.

Ah well, when energy industry lobby firms run out of money to pay the NRSP principals to dissemble on climate change, at least the two spinmeisters have an exit strategy.

Thu, 2007-05-17 07:58Ross Gelbspan
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Fast Food Giants See a Whopper of a Problem

Corn's central role in our diet suggests that Earth's temperature fluctuations, and concerns over emissions that are believed to affect the climate, will become a more intensive focus for the companies that put food in our mouths, as they seek to meet demand with steady supplies and at prices that preserve, or even improve, profit.
Wed, 2007-05-16 11:57Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

New technology means coal can be both clean and reliable, UK think tank says

Coal has long been seen as a dirty fuel due to high carbon emissions, a key cause of climate change.

But a new report says clean technologies already in hand can reduce the environmental damage. Moreover, unlike some renewable energy, coal can be stored and provided on demand.

Wed, 2007-05-16 11:25Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

New book cites global warming as extreme-weather cause

Devastating wildfires rage across California and Florida, tornadoes raze entire cities in Kansas, and floods cover vast swaths of Missouri. Now, a conservation scientist has tied extreme weather to global warming and warned that it will only worsen with continued high human population growth.

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