Tue, 2007-06-19 13:51Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

ExxonMobil slowly shedding its "skeptical" skin

ExxonMobil's chief spokesman, Kenneth Cohen recently stated that, “Exxon Mobil Corp. never in the past decade doubted the risk from climate change… [and] had simply firmed up, or “evolved,” its understanding of the threat.”

If by firming up the science, Cohen means spending an estimated $23 million on think tanks and associations that have spent the better part of the last decade attacking the scientific evidence for human-induced global warming, then we couldn't agree more.

Tue, 2007-06-19 11:41Richard Littlemore
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Pinocchio Harris Dismisses CO2 Effect

The carbon dioxide emissions from Ontario coal stations would be more costly to remove but are not something we should be concerned about since their contribution to global climate change is insignificant.

It's amazing that Tom Harris can write stuff like this without having his nose bump up against his computer monitor.

Tue, 2007-06-19 11:26Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

A history of tobacco spin

Here's a video compilation we were working on for James Hoggan's recent keynote lecture to the Canadian Public Relations Society's national conference. We chose in the end to not use the video, but I thought it would be great for DeSmog readers.

Tue, 2007-06-19 10:28Bill Miller
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Surprise ally delivers a kick against global warming

A Colorado sports organization is pitching itself as the world’s first carbon-neutral soccer team . Based in Boulder, where the city council voted last year to adhere to the Kyoto Protocol – something the U.S. government has never done – the Colorado Rapids under-23 organization has vowed all carbon emissions produced by the team are offset by carbon reduction.

 
Sun, 2007-06-17 13:02Bill Miller
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Carbon ranching pushes rainforest preservation in global-warming battle

Carbon ranching is a way to protect rainforests, which inhale carbon dioxide and exhale oxygen to help cool the planet. At present, these woodlands are threatened by logging, mining, cattle production and, increasingly, sugar and palm oil plantations to fuel growing demand for ethanol. In fact, destruction of the world’s tropical forests now contributes more to global warming than China’s well-publicized industrial-pollution surge.

A pledge to help poorer nations reduce carbon emissions caused by slashing and burning their forests was in the final communiqué issued at the Group of 8 summit in Germany. The Bush administration has financed some tropical forest conservation projects in the past. Now, as Congress energetically debates new climate-change legislation, greater incentives for carbon ranching are advocated. As usual, the solution is simple economics.

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