Hundreds of Migratory Ducks Trapped on Toxic Oil Sands Pond

If the fact that the Alberta Oil Sands are the largest point source of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada isn't enough to get you to stand up and take notice, maybe the ducks trapped and dying in the toxic tailing ponds will.

The oil sands are licensed to use more fresh water in a year than the entire City of Calgary (about the same size as Austin, Texas) and 90% of that fresh water ends up in massive tailing ponds, so large that that they are considered one of the largest human-made structures in the world.

500 Scientists with Documented Doubts - about the Heartland Institute?

UPDATE: we have received notes now from 45 outraged scientists whose names appear on the list of 500. We've published more quotes here.

Dozens of scientists are demanding that their names be removed from a widely distributed Heartland Institute article entitled 500 Scientists with Documented Doubts of Man-Made Global Warming Scares.

The article, by Hudson Institute director and Heartland “Senior Fellow” Dennis T. Avery (inset), purports to list scientists whose work contradicts the overwhelming scientific agreement that human-induced climate change is endangering the world as we know it.

DeSmogBlog manager Kevin Grandia emailed 122 of the scientists yesterday afteroon, calling their attention to the list. So far - in less than 24 hours - three dozen of those scientists had responded in outrage, denying that their research supports Avery's conclusions and demanding that their names be removed.

Outrage in the Climate Science Community Continues Over the "500 Scientist" List

I view that the inclusion of my name in such a list without my permission or consensus has damaged my professional reputation as an atmospheric scientist.”

Dr. Ming Cai, Associate Professor, Department of Meteorology, Florida State University.

Earlier today we broke the story about dozens of scientists outraged at the use of their good names in an article by Heartland Institute's “Senior Fellow” Dennis Avery (inset) posted on their website entitled 500 Scientists with Documented Doubts of Man-Made Global Warming Scares.

The letters are pouring in from angry scientists, with over 45 scientists now demanding that there names be stricken from the list, some are going much further and threatening legal action.

Terra Preta, Biochar, Black Gold: a Climate Change Solution

It's no silver bullet, but Terra Preta de Indio, a centuries-old agricultural-waste management and fertilization practice, may provide part of the solution to global warming - and to the gathering world food shortage.

Terra Preta is a literal description of the “dark earth” that European explorers first discovered in the Amazon basin, earth that researchers now believe was enriched with charred agricultural waste. Preparing and mixing this biochar into the earth is a great way to sequester carbon AND to fertilize crops.

There are a host of challenges - a large number of hurdles to clear before biochar can be guaranteed as a useful solution to climate change - but when asked if it's a possible goal, Cornell University Assoc. Professor Johannes Lehmann, one of the world's leading experts on biochar, said: “Absolutely!”

Are You on the Heartland 500 List of "Doubters"

Earlier today we broke the story about dozens of scientists outraged that their name is included on a list widely distributed by the Heartland Institute with an article entitled 500 Scientists with Documented Doubts of Man-Made Global Warming Scares.

The article is written by Dennis Avery, a “Senior Fellow” at the Heartland Institute. The article which was first published by another think tank called the Hudson Institute, where Avery is also listed as a “Senior Fellow,” has bounced around the internet as proof that there is great doubts about the realities of human-caused global warming.

We emailed 122 of the scientists and in less than 24 hours more than 35 scientists have responded in outrage.

The list of the Heartland 500 is attached. If you are on the list please let us know by email at: [email protected].


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