Wind Power Outpaces Nuclear, China Outpaces Itself

A new report issued by the Worldwatch Institute finds that new wind power installations outpaced new nuclear power plant construction by 10-to-1. Globally, the wind industry added 20,000 MW of new capacity last year, while the nuclear industry added less than 2,000 MW.

A big surprise for the author of the report was the massive upswing in wind installations in China:

“The biggest surprise is China, which was barely in the wind business three years ago but which in 2007 trailed only the United States and Spain in wind installations and was fifth in total installed capacity. An estimated 3,449 mega­watts of wind turbines were added in 2007, bringing China's provisional total to 6,050 megawatts and already exceeding the govern­ment's target for 2010.”

Some Clean Coal Facts and Fiction on CNBC

CNBC's Mark Haines asks: “How Realistic is Clean Coal,” and Haines does a great job off the top by pointing out that his guest, Steve Miller of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE), is funded by the coal industry.

This type of disclosure is important, as it provides viewers with some valuable context when hearing what Mr. Miller has to say. As Miller states on the show, his organization ACCCE is funded by:

“The coal producers, railroads and other transporters, generators… we got them all, manufacturers as well.”

New Honda is powered by hydrogen, not fossil fuels

Honda Motor of Japan has launched the world’s first hydrogen-powered fuel-cell vehicle intended for mass production.

Although it will make just 200 of its FCX Clarity vehicles over the next three years, Honda plans eventually to increase production, especially as hydrogen filling stations become more common.

And even the small initial run represents progress toward a clean-burning technology many have rejected as too exotic and too expensive to gain wide acceptance.

World Economic Forum Makes Climate Change Case to G8 Leaders

In a Report to G8 host and Japanese Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda, the corporate heavyweights of the World Economic Forum and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) have set out an aggressive set of recommendations for addressing climate change.

The report, endorsed by CEOs from Alcoa, Royal Dutch Shell and 97 other mutli-nationals, begins with a broad statement of clarity:

While some uncertainties remain – applying a risk management perspective to the available information – we conclude that a reasonable approach is for all leaders of business and government to take action now.

Bush Panel Pins Nasty Weather on Climate Change

“Droughts, heavy downpours, excessive heat, and intense hurricanes are likely to become more commonplace as humans continue to increase the atmospheric concentrations of heat-trapping greenhouse gases,” according to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program.

The full report, generated and released in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminstration, is available here.

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