Wed, 2007-05-16 09:30Kevin Grandia
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Petroleum Geologists Association changing its climate change tune

It seems that the American Association of Petroleum Geologists is softening its former hard-line stance on global warming.

A new proposed position paper on their site contains a lukewarm acknowledgment of the role human activity and greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels plays in the present warming. They state:

Humans, simply by virtue of the size of the world's population, represent a new agent of change through our significant modifications related to land use, urbanization, industrial activity, and through changes in atmospheric composition related to fuel combustion and deforestation.”

H/T to Eli Rabbet for tracking this down.
Tue, 2007-05-15 23:00Kevin Grandia
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NASA finds "vast regions" of Antarctic melting

NASA released a new report today revealing clear evidence of extensive snow melt in 2005 due to warmer than normal temperatures.

Using their new QuikScat satellite, NASA found “the most significant melt observed using satellites during the past three decades.”

According to Conrad Steffen at the University of Colorado: “Antarctica has shown little to no warming in the recent past with the exception of the Antarctic Peninsula, but now large regions are showing the first signs of the impacts of warming..”

Tue, 2007-05-15 11:29Ross Gelbspan
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Are We Outsourcing Our Sinks?

Climate change change may have passed a key tipping point that could mean temperatures rising more quickly than predicted. Scientists say a surge of carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere in recent years is due to more greenhouse gas escaping from trees, plants and soils. Global warming was making vegetation less able to absorb the carbon pollution pumped out by human activity.

Tue, 2007-05-15 07:42Ross Gelbspan
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Scientists Cancel The Day After Tomorrow

Mainstream climatologists who have feared that global warming could have the paradoxical effect of cooling northwestern Europe or even plunging it into a small ice age have stopped worrying about that particular disaster, although it retains a vivid hold on the public imagination.

The bottom line is that the atmosphere is warming up so much that a slowdown of the North Atlantic Current will never be able to cool Europe,' said Helge Drange, a professor at the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center in Bergen, Norway.”

Mon, 2007-05-14 21:27Kevin Grandia
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A bio of James Hoggan

If you want to know more about James Hoggan go here. There's more on James Hoggan's with his bio here at desmogblog.

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