UN Deep-Sixes Algae Seeding Scam

Nearly 200 countries agreed on Friday to a moratorium on projects to fight climate change by adding nutrients to the seas to spur growth of carbon-absorbing algae. Opponents argue the little-tested process has unknown risks which could threaten marine life, for instance by making the oceans more acidic.

Clean Coal's Costs Put It On Life Support!

How many windmills could we build for the cost of one clean coal plant?

Coal is abundant and cheap, assuring that it will continue to be used. But the failure to start building, testing, tweaking and perfecting carbon capture and storage means that developing the technology may come too late to make coal compatible with limiting global warming.“It’s a total mess,” said Daniel M. Kammen, director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley.

Skeptics' Longest, Strongest Argument Kicks the Bucket

The humble bucket turns out to be at the bottom of a perplexing anomaly in the climate records for the twentieth century.

Land and ocean temperature measurements show a strange cooling of about 0.3 °C in the global mean temperature in 1945. A US–British team of climate scientists has now found a surprisingly simple explanation for the long-standing conundrum. It turns out that the mysterious drop is due to differences in the way that British and US ships' crews measured the sea surface temperature (SST) in the 1940s.

Book cites population growth as key driver of global warming

After virtually abandoning the issue for three decades, the environmental movement got a bold reality check this week from a new book highlighting relentless human population growth as a driving force behind global warming.

This wouldn’t have raised eyebrows in the 1970s, when the modern environmental movement had its genesis and Paul Erlich’s “The Population Bomb” was on just about everybody’s bookshelf.

Since then, however, overpopulation has dropped from the vocabulary of most environmentalists despite a near doubling of the world’s numbers to an estimated 6.8 billion people today.


ExxonMobil Still the Bull in the Climate Shop

He was going to be smooth. Polished. Charming. The new face of ExxonMobil, presented to us back in March 2006:

“We recognize that climate change is a serious issue,” Mr. Tillerson said during a 50-minute interview last week, pointing to a recent company report that acknowledged the link between the consumption of fossil fuels and rising global temperatures. “We recognize that greenhouse gas emissions are one of the factors affecting climate change.”

That image completely fell apart at a news conference yesterday.

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