Exxon's Earnings Track Global Temperatures

Exxon Mobil reported second-quarter earnings of $11.68 billion Thursday, the biggest quarterly profit ever by any U.S. corporation.

Coal Industry's ACCCE mixes apples (coal) with oranges (wind)

Over at the Clean Coal Front Group Soapbox (er, blog), ACCCE Vice President of Communications Joe Lucas has a new post entitled:

All New Technologies Take Time to Develop

He basically claims that wind and solar power projects take an indefinite amount of time to become fully operational for commercial use, and therefore we shouldn’t be criticizing him and the “clean coal” industry for how long it will take carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) to become commercially feasible.

Simply put, his post is flat-out disingenous.

Here’s Lucas’ post:

A favorite sound bite from critics of the coal industry is that CCT and carbon sequestration aren’t viable energy solutions because they will take too long to develop. When pressed for an alternative, these critics repeat a mantra of their own: more wind, more solar.

And they’re right. We’re going to need every resource we’ve got to meet our future energy needs – wind and solar included. But just like clean coal technology, these renewables also need time for development. As we’ve discussed here before, we’re a long way from mass implementation of wind and solar power – there are still some kinks to work out.

Just this week it was announced that Oregon regulators have approved construction of a new wind farm that developers say could be the world’s largest. The only problem? They don’t know when it will be operational.

As we said, these things take time.

I contacted Jérôme Guillet, a wind energy expert, who has written multiple articles for the reality-based blogosphere. He had this to say about Mr. Lucas’ post:

[Since Lucas is] referring to that big Oregon windfarm that just got its permits, he’s chosen the wrong target. The longest part is usually the part before obtaining the permits - choosing the site, making wind measurements, asking for all the authorisations and permits, getting access to the land, etc… Once you have the permits, you’re usually less than a year or two from construction, which itself takes 6-12 months.

The article to which Lucas links is behind a subscription wall, so we have to do our own search for news about the Oregon wind farms. The wind farm is scheduled to go online in about two years, which goes along with Guillet’s statement.

Guillet continues:

So we’re talking a couple of years, a delay that could certainly be shortened if it were a real priority, because the project is, by then, designed, the technology is available and the construction is fairly simple. Comparing that to CCS which is not an industrially proven technology, where you’re talking about an unknown number of years before people will actually look at investing money into commercial projects, let alone build them, is patently silly.

Basically, if there are (or had been) any uncertainties with the Oregon project, they would have nothing to do with technical uncertainties; they would have to do with business logistics uncertainties.

Guillet nails it. Lucas’ assertions are silly.

Massive Profits, High Gas Prices and $33 billion in Taxpayer Giveaways to Big Oil

Over the next 5 years oil companies will receive $33 billion in taxpayer funded giveaways.

According to the report set to be released tomorrow morning by the Friends of the Earth, (pdf) the $33 billion in taxpayer dollars will come to Big Oil through tax loopholes, royalty rollbacks and research and development subsidies.

Is CORE fighting for the poor or Big Oil?

UPDATE: Heard through the grapevine that CORE will be on the Canadian CBC show, the Current tomorrow morning. We've contacted the producers and have offered to provide more information.


With major corporate donations in the past from big players like Monsanto and ExxonMobil, I apologize for being more than a little cynical about the Congress of Racial Equality's latest “Stop the War on the Poor” campaign.

To say the CORE has enjoyed a cozy relationship with big industry would be an understatement. In fact, the above photo is a picture of Monsanto's Chairman and CEO, Hugh Grant chairing CORE's celebratory reception in honor of Martin Luther King Jr in 2005.

CORE's War on the Poor and the Environment

An organization called the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) recently launched an anti-environmentalist pro-energy campaign called the 'War on the Poor.”

CORE, along with two partnering groups, the High Impact Leadership Coalition and Americans for American Energy, announced recently that the campaigns goal is:

to publicly unmask more than 100 politicians and 50 environmental extremist groups that are waging an immoral  'war on the poor' by pushing policies that limit America’s ability to produce more America energy and drive energy prices skyward.”

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