Is Burying Carbon in the Ground the Answer to the Woes of Coal?

They call it “clean coal. ” They tell us that the pollution problem is “fixed” and the solution to the greenhouse gas implication is just around the corner.

They say, “Don't worry that burning coal releases more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than any other fuel source . We'll soon 'sequester' that stuff: we'll bury it in the ground.”

How soon?

Burying the carbon produced from the burning of coal, so called Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS), isn't as simple as the coal advocates would have us think. At the rate CCS technology is being developed, Richard Branson will have figured out how to send tourists to Moon before we see anyone storing significant amounts of carbon under our feet.

Bush's EPA: 'Greenhouse Gases May Be Just Dandy!'

EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson has shelved his agency's findings that greenhouse gases are a danger to the public, and on Thursday told Congress that he will initiate a lengthy public comment period about whether such emissions are a risk before responding to a U.S. Supreme Court order.

The move means there is virtually no chance the Bush administration will act to regulate greenhouse gases in response to the high court's decision in the time left in office.

DSCOVR on the Celsias Show

Here's a radio interview DeSmog contributing writer and researcher Mitchell Anderson recently did on Celsias Radio.

The Celsias Show has been running for a few weeks and DeSmogBlog has been contributing to a 5-minute portion called “The Week in Denial.”

100,000 Wells Needed to Store US Carbon Emissions

Even if carbon capture storage technology was not a myth on par with flying cars, the reality is that in order to store the amount of heat-trapping greenhouse gas produced by the United States, “100,800 new wells would be needed by 2030 in America if Washington commits to meeting the Kyoto Protocol emission requirement and keeping total carbon emissions at 2005 levels.”

H/T to our friends at

Business Climate Campaign an Attack on Democracy

Talk may be cheap, but speech isn't free, not even in America. It a time when the most outspoken pay $3 million for a 30-second Superbowl ad, it can be expensive to get your point across.

Which is no problem for the Alliance for Energy and Economic Growth and its fellow travelers at the American Council for Capital Formation. When they launch a cross-country campaign to bash Congressional efforts to address climate change, they start with a big budget, liberally funded by the energy and manufacturing interests most heavily invested in cheap gas, oil and coal.


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