Thu, 2007-05-17 07:58Ross Gelbspan
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Fast Food Giants See a Whopper of a Problem

Corn's central role in our diet suggests that Earth's temperature fluctuations, and concerns over emissions that are believed to affect the climate, will become a more intensive focus for the companies that put food in our mouths, as they seek to meet demand with steady supplies and at prices that preserve, or even improve, profit.
Wed, 2007-05-16 11:57Bill Miller
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New technology means coal can be both clean and reliable, UK think tank says

Coal has long been seen as a dirty fuel due to high carbon emissions, a key cause of climate change.

But a new report says clean technologies already in hand can reduce the environmental damage. Moreover, unlike some renewable energy, coal can be stored and provided on demand.

Wed, 2007-05-16 11:25Bill Miller
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New book cites global warming as extreme-weather cause

Devastating wildfires rage across California and Florida, tornadoes raze entire cities in Kansas, and floods cover vast swaths of Missouri. Now, a conservation scientist has tied extreme weather to global warming and warned that it will only worsen with continued high human population growth.

Wed, 2007-05-16 09:30Kevin Grandia
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Petroleum Geologists Association changing its climate change tune

It seems that the American Association of Petroleum Geologists is softening its former hard-line stance on global warming.

A new proposed position paper on their site contains a lukewarm acknowledgment of the role human activity and greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels plays in the present warming. They state:

Humans, simply by virtue of the size of the world's population, represent a new agent of change through our significant modifications related to land use, urbanization, industrial activity, and through changes in atmospheric composition related to fuel combustion and deforestation.”

H/T to Eli Rabbet for tracking this down.
Tue, 2007-05-15 23:00Kevin Grandia
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NASA finds "vast regions" of Antarctic melting

NASA released a new report today revealing clear evidence of extensive snow melt in 2005 due to warmer than normal temperatures.

Using their new QuikScat satellite, NASA found “the most significant melt observed using satellites during the past three decades.”

According to Conrad Steffen at the University of Colorado: “Antarctica has shown little to no warming in the recent past with the exception of the Antarctic Peninsula, but now large regions are showing the first signs of the impacts of warming..”

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