Alaska's Sen. Ted Stevens: It's sunspots! Let's get out the oil drills

At a meeting of the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, Alaska's Senator Ted Stevens claimed that the unprecedented decline in Arctic sea ice melting is probably due to sunspots.

Of course, if a major plank in your political platform is the opening up of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil exploration, you probably would be inclined to grasp at anything to discredit the human-induced theory of global warming as well.

Soaring divorce rates cited as factor in global warming, environmental stress

As world leaders in Bali strive for agreement on a successor to the Kyoto Protocol, a new study in the U.S. has given the climate-change struggle a domestic perspective.

The escalating number of divorces leads to greater use of energy, researchers say, and governments should take this into account when formulating environmental policies.

New York Times Features DeSmog's 100 Year Letter Project

Check out the New York Times today. 

Science writer Andrew Revkin mentions our 100 Year Letter Project here.

And if that wasn't enough, he also wrote a more in-depth piece on his new Dot Earth blog.   

If you haven't written your entry for the 100 Year Letter Project, please do. In fact, we've decided that the best letters every month will receive a DeSmogBlog swag bag, including the much-coveted DeSmog t-shirt.

We have quite a few already and will start posting them over the next week.

Bali: UNFCC Makes Case for Climate Cure

This China View article gives a simple, compelling argument for why the developed world should, in the short term, carry the lion's share of the responsibility for climate change: first, we created the lion's share of the problem; and second, we have the capacity to do so while letting the developing world pull their populations out of poverty.

James Hansen and the Holocaust Frame: not even heroes are perfect

Just in case you were wondering, the new Beowulf movie is pretty awful–but there's at least one thing interesting about it. It turns a heroic character without any apparent flaws (the original Beowulf) into a guy that, well, has loads of them. In so doing, it modernizes the story (and, as it happens, trashes the original poem).

Weirdly, I thought of Beowulf when I read the latest about NASA's James Hansen, our most famous climate scientist, who used an unfortunate Holocaust-related analogy to discuss the impact of global warming on endangered species in recent testimony in his home state, Iowa.


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