A Guide to Carbon Capping Policy in the US

One of the most effective ways to cut through the climate change spin is to offer up simple and straightforward information that can be easily understood by those outside the environmental policy-wonk and scientific community.  

The best example I've seen in a while is a very useful guide (attached) on the ins-and-outs of US carbon capping policy developed by Peter Barnes at the Tomales Bay Institute in Minneapolis.  

While the report outlines carbon cap policy in an American context, the general and very-easy to read concepts could apply to just about anywhere in the world. 

This valuable guide is something that should be downloaded and e-mailed to everyone you know.

Funny, In an Embarrasing Kind of Way

The Folks at the New York Times posted submissions for a mock conversation between Al Gore and President Bush's exchange at the White House. Can you say AWKWARD!

Not Easy Being Green for Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper [video]

Canada’s PM pilloried over climate-change shuffle; rich nations urged to ante up

Criticism just keeps pouring in.

A United Nations report, native leaders, wildlife officials and the David Suzuki Foundation have all taken issue with Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s maneuver last weekend blocking agreement on binding greenhouse emissions targets. Pressure is mounting for Harper to atone when negotiations on a successor to Kyoto convene next month in Bali.

Bjorn Lomborg: Saving the world from phony analogies

The Industrialists' Environmentalist, Bjorn Lomborg, stepped out today with a (password protected) Globe and Mail article likening the effects of climate change to the death toll from traffic accidents: it's something we could easily fix, Lomborg says, but we don't want to because driving around is too convenient.

This is another painful example of Lomborg's skill at turning the telescope around before studying what may be the greatest threat to global habitation in human history. In Lomborg's manipulated view, something very big is suddenly - reassuringly - teeny, tiny and easily ignored.


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