Global Warming Behind Water Crisis in Northeast China

Fri, 2007-11-09 09:44Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

Global Warming Behind Water Crisis in Northeast China

Government officials in China are claiming global warming as the culprit behind massive water shortages in Northeast China.

The famous Crescent Moon lake used to be over 10 meters deep, but is now only 1 meter deep as the encroaching desert sucks up the water. The disappearing lake at this point of the Silk Road is the most powerful symbol of an emerging water crisis.

China's Water Resources minister, Chen Lei, said recently that an annual water shortage of nearly 40 billion cubic meters in China can be blamed on global warming. “The changes have led to a combination of both frequent drought and flooding.”

Previous Comments

As I read the article, I couldn’t help but draw parallels with the American Southwest.

[x]

A new report, issued the same day the latest round of global climate negotiations opened in Peru, highlights the fracking industry's slow expansion into nearly every continent, drawing attention not only to the potential harm from toxic pollution, dried-up water supplies and earthquakes, but also to the threat the shale industry poses to the world's climate.

The report, issued by Friends of the Earth Europe, focuses on the prospects for fracking in 11 countries in Africa, Asia, North...

read more