James Mahoney

James Mahoney

James Mahoney

Background

James Mahoney has been employed by Koch Industries, Inc. since 1988.  He is currently the Vice President for Operations Excellence and Compliance and is a member of the board of directors. Additionally, Mahoney has served as the chairman of the board for the National Petrochemical and Refineries Association (NPRA).

Mahoney and the National Petrochemical Refineries Association

James Mahoney served as the chairman of the NPRA from 2007 to 2008 and remains a member of its board of directors.  The NPRA is a national trade association for the petrochemical and refining industries.  It has over 500 members including Exxon Mobil Corporation, Chevron Corporation, BP p.l.c., Koch Industries, Inc., Shell Chemical Company, and Solutia, Inc. (Monsanto’s chemical branch).

The primary aim of the National Petrochemical and Refineries Association is to provide a voice for policies that promote a balance between energy supply needs and the environment.  The NPRA’s official stance on climate change is that it “supports the advancement and deployment of new technologies that bring reliable, affordable and clean supplies of domestic energy to consumers.” 

However, the NPRA also claims that the majority of the current legislative and regulatory approaches to climate change will not only result in serious harm to the American economy, but also have “no measurable environmental benefit.”

At the 106th NPRA Annual Meeting held on March 11, 2008, Chairman James Mahoney clarified NPRA’s climate change position when he stated that “any climate change legislation will have a dramatic long-term impact on the entire US economy and should therefore be considered very carefully.  Given the current technology in the refining industry, we have limited options to change greenhouse gas output.” 

Mahoney went on to explain that the best method for tackling climate change is to promote an open, competitive, and free market for all of America’s industries.  The NPRA remains unapologetic for its free market position on climate change.