Asia/Pacific

Mon, 2007-06-04 11:06Ross Gelbspan
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China's New Climate Plan -- Made in the USA?

China vowed to “blaze a new path to industrialisation” today as it unveiled its first national plan on climate change.

But in a blow to efforts to tackle global warming, the world's second biggest producer of greenhouse gases refused to accept binding targets for emissions, saying wealthy developed nations must take the bulk of the responsibility for the problem.

Tue, 2007-05-29 09:50Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Mum Harper seen backing Bush effort to undermine international climate-change pact

The Prime Minister is under fire from both Liberals and New Democrats for remaining non-committal on whether Canada will back a proposal by Germany for a post-Kyoto agreement when G8 nations meet in Germany next week. China, India, Brazil, Mexico and South Africa will also be part of the discussions.

Thu, 2007-05-24 10:10Kevin Grandia
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Japan's PM looks beyond Kyoto

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has proposed a new international framework that would see worldwide carbon emissions cut in half by 2050.

Prime Minister Abe is getting a little unfair criticism for being short on details of what the final emission targets of his plan will look like. But Abe is right in his diplomatic obfuscation (for now), these are early days and a new international framework will have to take pains to ensure that it is embraced by the United States, who opted not to be part of the Kyoto Protocol.

Thu, 2007-05-17 09:26Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Broad coalition of cities and banks pledge billions to curb carbon emissions

The assembly of 16 of the world’s largest cities and five banks also includes ex-President Bill Clinton, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and several corporations. Under the plan, developed through the William J. Clinton Foundation, participating banks would provide up to $1 billion each in loans to cities or private landlords to upgrade energy-hungry heating, cooling and lighting systems in older buildings.

Wed, 2007-05-16 11:57Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

New technology means coal can be both clean and reliable, UK think tank says

Coal has long been seen as a dirty fuel due to high carbon emissions, a key cause of climate change.

But a new report says clean technologies already in hand can reduce the environmental damage. Moreover, unlike some renewable energy, coal can be stored and provided on demand.

Tue, 2007-04-24 10:48Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Rebuffed at UN, Britain continues world climate-change crusade

Accused of scaremongering for taking climate change before the UN Security Council last week, Britain is standing firm in insisting it’s a global challenge that must not be allowed to degenerate into regional bickering.

Mon, 2007-04-23 11:42Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

New York welcomes Earth Day with $8 tax on cars entering Manhattan

The measure is among 127 proposals for what Mayor Michael Bloomberg calls “a greener, greater New York.” But it still has to clear formidable hurdles in the State Legislature where, as The New York Times put it, “too many good ideas like this one go to die.”

Fri, 2007-04-20 09:57Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Prominent newspaper highlights link between security and global warming

The New York Times says the climate-change debate took “a useful turn” this week as “persuasive connections” were drawn between national security and global warming, causing even those who customarily scoff at environmental issues to take notice.

Wed, 2007-04-18 10:44Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Britain and China lock horns in UN global-warming debate

The British government, which had initiated the first-ever climate-change discussions before the UN Security Council, pushed the issue because of its potential to cause wars. China, however, said the 15-member body had no authority to deal with it.

Thu, 2007-04-12 10:44Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Kerry, Gingrich at odds over global-warming strategy

Massachusetts Senator and former presidential candidate John Kerry and ex-House Speaker Newt Gingrich are advocating separate approaches to climate change, with Kerry calling for government regulation and Gingrich touting voluntary change fuelled by government incentives.

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