PR Watch on the Heartland Conference: The Monkeys and Their Organ Grinders

Mon, 2009-03-09 21:47Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

PR Watch on the Heartland Conference: The Monkeys and Their Organ Grinders

Bob Burton at Sourcewatch has substantial piece up on the Heartland Institute’s climate change conference in New York.

Choice quote:

“Many global warming skeptics directly or indirectly receive funding from the oil, coal or other industries with a stake in the dangerous status quo. Of course, revelations of such funding torpedo the skeptics’ credibility. Perhaps that’s why Heartland, in describing its skeptics conference, insists that “no corporate sponsorships or dollars earmarked for the event were solicited or accepted.” The claim may sound reassuring, but we should take it with a grain of salt, especially since Heartland is not disclosing which foundations are funding the conference.”

Here’s the entire article: Monkeys and their Organ Grinders

Comments

The warming of planet Earth is “the biggest global health threat of the 21st century,” a varied group of experts warned Wednesday.

thank you,

low credit score loans
The speakers were Guiseppe Falieri, an Italian who had recently arrived in this city, and Mr. Reiche, the animal importer of New York. The Italian was one of those fortunate sons of Italy who arrive in this country with a little money. Fta

Corporations wanting help in advancing their agendas often turn to think tanks. In addition to providing the appearance of independent support for corporate policies, think tanks combine a scholarly image with expertise at how to play the media and policymakers alike.

PDF Printer

[x]

Crossposted from PolluterWatch blog on Jay Lehr.

If you're John Stossel and you want to host a segment to rail against the US Environmental Protection Agency, who ought you call?

It turns out, a man who was convicted and sentenced to six months in prison for defrauding the EPA!

Stossel's guest last night, Jay Lehr, was sentenced to six months–serving three–in...

read more