Scientific American digs deep on climate change

Mon, 2006-08-28 10:11Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

Scientific American digs deep on climate change

If you're looking for a great read on climate change and renewable energy pick up the Sept, 06 special issue of Scientific American, titled Energy's Future Beyond Carbon. SCIAM gives a great in-depth analysis of the latest and greatest in renewable energy options and provides an extensive analysis on the realities of human-induced climate change.

Best $5 bucks I've spent in a while.

Here are links to some of the articles SCIAM has posted on-line as freebies:

A Climate Repair Manual
Global warming is a reality.
Innovation in energy technology and policy are sorely needed if we are to cope
By Gary Stix

The Nuclear Option
A threefold expansion of nuclear power could contribute significantly to staving off climate change by avoiding one billion to two billion tons of carbon emissions annually
By John M. Deutch and Ernest J. Moniz

Comments

      While nuclear power is debated as an option in the battle against global warming, few people understand how atomic energy really functions in the United States.  (That includes most of the pundits and academics doing the debating.) 

     Since it would be a good idea to understand our nuclear present before we decide on our nuclear future, I have written an insider’s view of nuclear energy for the layperson, based on my two decades in the industry.  The good news for those tired of dry discussions is that my overview is the form of a thriller novel.

     “Rad Decision” can be found at http://RadDecision.blogspot.com and is available at no cost to readers - who seem to like it, judging from their comments on the home page.  Those on all sides of the nuclear issue will find much to think about. 

          James Aach

“I’d like to see Rad Decision widely read.”  Stewart Brand, founder of The Whole Earth Catalog and author of “Environmental Heresies” in  MIT’s Technology Review - which called for a second look at nuclear.