Sparks already flying at United Nation's climate talks

Tue, 2007-11-13 12:05Emily Murgatroyd
Emily Murgatroyd's picture

Sparks already flying at United Nation's climate talks

Didn't take long for word to get out that the UN climate change talks underway in Valencia, Spain are already bogging down.

The French Press Agency is reporting that, “… there had been by sharp exchanges over what the document should include and whether it should reflect findings published after a cut-off date for new material.”

The Australian Age is reporting that the report “… has been watered down as a result of influence from government officials from countries opposed to taking radical action.”

We have a copy of the pre-negotiation report and will be comparing it to the final publicly released document to be issued this Saturday, November 17.

Stay tuned.

Previous Comments

The IPCC cut-off deadline for new information on climate change for their reports seems rather foolish…no, very foolish.
AGW doesn’t seem to obeying any sort of “deadline”!?
Is there a valid reason for this or is there a restriction placed on them by politics?

Perhaps they are concerned that without a firm deadline release of the reports (and any positive action that might result) would be delayed while material trickled in over time. Or that contributors would be less committed to meeting the deadline. It can be problematic. And material that misses the deadline can always be released independently in journals as “addenda”.

I guess that even if some information missed the boat, at least the boat left the dock.

[x]

California Governor Jerry Brown used the occasion of his fourth inaugural address to propose an ambitious new clean energy target for the state: 50% renewable energy by 2030.

“We are at a crossroads,” Brown said in announcing the proposal, according to Climate Progress. “The challenge is to build for the future, not steal from it, to live within our means and to keep California ever golden and creative.”

Already the leader in installed solar...

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