action on climate change

Meet the Climate Change Activists Inside Matt Ridley’s Conscience

They slipped into place under the cover of darkness. With bicycle D-locks around their necks chained to diggers in the middle of the UK’s largest open-cast coal mine, and arms sealed inside concrete-laden, red-sequined tubes at the site’s entrance, this was Matt Ridley’s Conscience calling for the end of coal – the dirtiest fossil fuel of them all.

By dawn, mine workers and lorry drivers, unable to enter the site, turned away. After eight and a half hours of peaceful protest and nine arrests, victory was declared Monday afternoon for having successfully closed operations for the day.

This is what happens when a group of concerned individuals come together to act on climate change. But who exactly are these individuals and why are they calling themselves ‘Matt Ridley’s Conscience’?

Six Commitments Missing From the Oil and Gas Major’s Climate Declaration

Major fossil fuel companies have today released a Joint Collaborative Declaration under the Oil & Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI) recognising the need to limit global average temperature rise to 2⁰C. Launched in Paris this morning, they are calling for an “effective climate change agreement at COP21”.

In the declaration, ten oil and gas giants call for “widespread and effective pricing of carbon emissions”. Signatories include the CEOs of Total, Statoil, BP, Shell, BG Group, Saudi Aramco, Pemex, Sinopec, Eni, Reliance, and Repsol.

The companies also back natural gas as a cleaner alternative to coal and want to see more research and development into renewables and carbon capture and storage.  However, the declaration has been criticised for lacking concrete targets.

Climate Justice Movement Highlights Women as 'Key' to Climate Solutions

Women from around the world are mobilising today to call for action on climate change as international leaders meet in New York at the United Nations General Assembly.

“There is no climate justice without gender justice,” the movement argues. Solutions and policy demands will be presented in New York City as part of the Global Women’s Climate Justice Day of Action in an effort to highlight the reality that while women are among those most severely vulnerable to the effects of climate change, women are also the “key to creating climate solutions.”

The aim is to get political officials to agree “equitable, immediate, and bold action on climate change” as we enter the final two months before the COP21 climate change negotiations in Paris in December. At this time, the Women’s Climate Declaration will be presented to world governments.

Low-Carbon 'Policy Gap' Risks UK Missing Emission Reduction Targets Warns Lord Deben

sun setting on wind turbines in the distance via Chrishna Flickr

The government must end the uncertainty clouding the direction of Britain’s low-carbon policies writes Lord Deben, chairman of the Committee on Climate Change (CCC), in a letter sent today to Energy Secretary Amber Rudd.

Recent policy changes – including cuts to renewable subsidies and abolishing the Green Deal as well as the Zero Carbon Standard for homes – “have been widely interpreted to have reduced the action being taken to meet the clear commitment to carbon budgets. They have, in some areas, left a policy gap which urgently needs to be addressed,” Deben argues.

The uncertainty created by changes to existing policies and a lack of replacement policies up to and after 2020 could well lead to stop-start investment, higher costs and a risk that targets to reduce emissions will be missed.”

Will the Paris COP21 Climate Conference Make a Difference or Should We Try Something New?

Will COP21 make a difference?” This was the question being posed by Professor Scott Barrett, leading expert on transnational and global challenges and Professor of Natural Resource Economics at Columbia University.

Speaking at the London School of Economics, Barrett asked: “Will [Paris] sow the seeds… that will lead us to do what we need to do, which is basically to transform the world’s energy system? The markets don’t want to do it on their own, which is an unprecedented challenge for the whole world. Will it do that? Or, will it do what every meeting before this has done, which is to disappoint?”

After all, it's been 25 years and over 20 conferences. What's changed?

Government Keeps Climate Cards Close to its Chest

It’s been four months since Amber Rudd was made head of the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and there are just three months before the Paris climate conference. So, what do we know about the UK’s contribution to international climate change negotiations? Turns out, not much.

According to the (very limited) information released to DeSmog UK by DECC under a Freedom of Information request, Rudd has met with international counterparts five times since May 2015, in Berlin, Luxembourg and Beijing, to discuss the COP21 climate targets.

And, well, that’s about it. The department acknowledged that they hold briefing materials that were provided to the Secretary of State ahead of these meetings but have withheld all of these.

Apple Quits U.S. Chamber of Commerce Over Climate

Apple became the fourth company in recent days to completely sever ties with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce over the business lobby’s backwards stance on climate change.

In a letter to the Chamber obtained by the New York Times, Apple states [PDF]:

Hunting for Solutions

Over 670 fishing and hunting organizations, representing millions of Americans have banded together to call on the US government to enact strong global warming legislation.

H/T to Think Progress .

Gore urges U.S. Congress to take speedy action on global warming

In his first return since 2001, when he was the defeated Democratic nominee still presiding over the Senate in his role as vice president, Gore told Congress they must slash carbon dioxide and other global warming gases 90 percent by 2050 to avert a crisis.

ABC: less talk, more action

 ABC urges action on climate change…. NOW

How's this for a quote: “… nearly every research institution in the study of global climate change - from the American Academy of Sciences to the atmospheric department at your local university - has issued reports citing overwhelming  evidence that the planet is changing.”
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