conservative party of canada

Wed, 2011-05-04 13:56Emma Pullman
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Facing Four More Years of Harper Inaction, Canadians Must Rally Their Own Climate Leadership

Earlier this week, Canadians flocked to the polls for the fourth time in 7 years. This time around, the election was triggered when the minority government led by Conservative Party leader Stephen Harper was found in contempt of parliament in March for failing to release information related to the costs of proposed crime legislation and the purchase of stealth fighter jets.

From the moment the election was announced, Harper derided it as ‘unnecessary’, and ‘unwanted’ even though public polling clearly indicated widespread displeasure with his handling of the economy, public programming including programs for women, the environment, and for proroguing parliament twice. After the 2008 election, when voter turnout was the lowest in Canadian history (59% overall, and a dismal youth turnout of 37%), people wondered if this so-called ‘unwanted’ election would fail to motivate voters to the polls.

While pundits and pollsters made their best guesses leading up to election day, no one correctly anticipated the outcome. With just under 40% of the vote, the Conservatives finally won the majority they have coveted since ascending in 2006. The New Democratic Party (NDP) won 102 seats and formed the official opposition for the first time in history. The Liberal Party was reduced to a mere 34 seats, and the Bloc Quebecois lost 90% of its seats to end up with 4. On the positive side, Green Party candidate Elizabeth May won her party’s first seat in North American history.

Of the 14 closest ridings that Conservatives won seats, the combined margin of victory in all those ridings was 6,201 votes. That means the real difference between a Harper minority and majority was just over 6,000 votes. While 5.8 million people voted for Stephen Harper, another 9 million – the ‘real majority’ – voted for change. But, with his new majority, Harper no longer has to worry about impediments to his extreme ideology; he can ram his anti-science, pro-polluter agenda down the throats of the Canadian public. That spells trouble for Canada’s environment, and it’s especially bad news for the global climate.

Fri, 2008-09-26 13:27Richard Littlemore
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Economists Denounce Harper "Climate Plan"

Conservative policy “highly likely” to fail

Three top economists, led by Dr. Mark Jaccard of Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, have released an analysis (attached) of the Conservative government's climate policy, saying that, as designed, the might make no headway whatever in reducing Canadian CO2 emissions.

Jaccard and fellow economists Nic Rivers and Jotham Peters, say the Tory plan is particularly faulty on two counts: it sets “intensity targets” that allow allow absolute emissions to continue going up, and it allows companies to purchase “offset” that completely absolve the firm of making any CO2 reductions itself. Both of these policies are proven failures in actually limiting or reducing the total emission of CO2.

Tue, 2008-09-09 15:41Mitchell Anderson
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Diesel Cuts Bad for Economy (and Planet)

What do you do to win an election? Roll out the pork of course. And so Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announces a proposed tax cut on diesel fuel, even if it will dig Canada even deeper into an economic and climate hole.

Canada already emits more carbon per capita than almost any other country on Earth. Our total carbon emissions are number seven worldwide – more than the United Kingdom, which has almost twice our population. Harper’s solution: make fuel even cheaper.

Mon, 2007-11-26 19:35Mitchell Anderson
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Canadian PM Stephen Harper's Do-Nothing Recipe for Gobal Warming

Stephen Harper seemed smug about his contribution at the Commonwealth conference in Uganda around the critical issue of climate change.

For the first time in a very long time Canada's voice is being heard. And the consequence of our voice being heard is we're getting the changes we want to see,” he said.

What he wanted, and what he got, was that the conference dissolved without a resolution that even mentioned binding carbon emissions targets.

Wed, 2006-09-20 16:25Kevin Grandia
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Ball preaches to the converted

Climate Skeptic Tim BallAfter his recent media pummeling, it seems that climate change skeptic Tim Ball isn't sticking his neck out too far into the public realm. The only upcoming presentations by Ball that we can find is one to the Victoria Chapter of the Conservative Party of Canada and one at the upcoming BC Oil and Gas Conference being held the first week of October in Dawson Creek.

I am sure Ball's slap-stick humour and fringe science will go over well with the two remaining demographics that, for the most part, refuse to pull their heads out of the sand.

Tue, 2006-09-12 10:43Richard Littlemore
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Tim Ball Completes Transition to Politician

Finally, Tim Ball has found a room in which he is unquestionably qualified to speak: On Friday, Sept. 22, Canada's foremost climate change denier will be the main course at a Conservative Party of Canada “breakfast event” in Victoria, B.C.
The invitation heralds “Dr Timothy Ball Ph.D.” the second reference to his strained academic credential apparently being there in case you missed the implication of the first.
Whether Dr. Ball was ever justified in passing himself off as a senior climate scientist (as opposed to a junior geographical historian) is a topic of justifiable debate, but there is no question that since his retirement 10 years ago, he has committed no act of science worth recording in a reputable scientific journal. It's also true that he has spent much of the last year as a pretty-much full-time campaigner against  the recognition of climate change as a matter of urgent public interest.
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