DSCOVR

Thu, 2010-01-14 10:03Mitchell Anderson
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The Real “Climategate” Story – Current Climate Satellites are Woefully Inadequate

The media missed the real story about the so-called “climate-gate” scandal.

After thousands of emails were mysteriously stolen from the University of East Anglia and distributed just before the climate conference in Copenhagen, many news outlets seemed content to report the story as it was presented to them rather than bothering to read the emails in the context they were written.

A closer look at these candid messages reveals a very different problem than the supposed scientific conspiracy theory that’s been in high rotation in the media. This previously unreported story also shows why launching the long-mothballed Deep Space Climate Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) is more urgent now than ever.

Lets start with perhaps the most widely distributed and misunderstood of the stolen emails, of October 12, 2009 from Dr. Keith Trenberth to Michael Mann, which reads:

The fact is that we can’t account for the lack of warming at the moment and it is a travesty that we can’t.

Sun, 2008-11-23 14:18Mitchell Anderson
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DesmogBlog Breaks DSCOVR Story in Nature

DesmogBlog was contacted this month by Nature – the most prestigious science journal in the world  – about our latest posting on the Deep Space Climate Observatory

It seems their editors were interested in the news we broke that the Air Force was considering launching this $100 million mothballed spacecraft – minus the Earth observing instruments.

Last week they published an 800 word article based on information we provided to them about this bizarre story.

Alas, our extensive research on the DSCOVR mission was not mentioned in the Nature article, but such is the lot of a blogger.

More importantly, the exposure provided by this piece in one of the premier journals in the world will hopefully light a fire under NASA to not to kill this vital mission.

Wed, 2008-10-29 16:44Mitchell Anderson
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DSCOVR Mission May Be Gutted

Here is the latest twist in the bizarre story about the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR). Apparently, the US Air Force is in discussions with NASA to take over the mission, with one important catch: that all the Earth observing instruments be removed.

It seems the Air Force is more interested in looking at the Sun than our warming planet and plans are being made to send the spacecraft one million miles distant – only to look the other way.

Thu, 2008-05-22 19:00Mitchell Anderson
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Congress Orders NASA to Deal With DSCOVR

In a stunning break from years of inaction, the US Congress has tabled legislation ordering NASA to finally deal with the critically important Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2008 was submitted last week to the House of Representatives. Section 207 of this Act is plainly entitled: “Plan For Disposition Of Deep Space Climate Observatory.

If this Act becomes law, NASA must finally cough up some answers on why this vital piece of space hardware has been sitting in a box for the last seven years.

Tue, 2008-05-13 00:59Mitchell Anderson
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Whitehouse Withholds DSCOVR Documents

The Bush Whitehouse continues to stonewall around the critically important Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).

I recently received a long-overdue response to a freedom of information request about the mission. After waiting six months, thirteen documents were located – and all were withheld from release.

So why did the Whitehouse even have “predecisional draft documents that include…deliberative comments” about the DSCOVR mission? Does this indicate the Bush administration had a direct hand in killing this project?

Fri, 2008-04-18 10:36Mitchell Anderson
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Did NASA Mislead the Media About the DSCOVR Climate Project?

New information provided by inside sources to DeSmogBlog raises questions about public statements from NASA when asked by the media about the cost of launching Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).

The date was January 24, 2008. Four NASA senior brass had just finished delivering a rambling one hour news briefing on their much-maligned Earth sciences program - noteworthy only in that there was no news. No new announcements. No new missions.

Seth Borenstein, the science reporter for Associated Press rose to ask the first question, specifically about why NASA had not launched DSCOVR.

Fri, 2008-03-28 12:45Mitchell Anderson
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Government Insider Document Shows Critical Importance of DSCOVR Climate Satellite


A fresh document recently provided to DeSmog Blog by inside sources shows the critical importance of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) to the US government.
 
The document is available for viewing here, and favorably compares DSCOVR’s capabilities with the stated science priorities of NOAA. The conclusion: the spacecraft would be a boon to monitoring our rapidly warming planet and tracking dangerous solar flares.
Thu, 2008-03-27 15:37Emily Murgatroyd
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DSCOVR on the Celsias Show

Here's a radio interview DeSmog contributing writer and researcher Mitchell Anderson recently did on Celsias Radio.

The Celsias Show has been running for a few weeks and DeSmogBlog has been contributing to a 5-minute portion called “The Week in Denial.”

Tue, 2008-02-19 09:23Mitchell Anderson
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NOAA Stonewalls on DCSOVR Documents

The stonewalling on DSCOVR documents continues, this time with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

To recap, NASA was given over $100 million in taxpayers money to build the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), a spacecraft designed to measure the energy budget of our warming planet from the unique vantage of a million miles away.

Even though it is fully completed over five years ago, DSCOVR is still sitting in a box at the Goddard Space Centre – likely for political reasons.

The mission was originally promoted by Al Gore – a liability when George Bush and Dick Cheney remain in the Whitehouse.

Wed, 2007-12-05 10:55Mitchell Anderson
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DSCOVR Grounded by Office Politics?

They spent $100 million on the spacecraft. It’s finished.
Two other countries and another US government agency have offered to launch it at no cost to NASA.
Yet it still remains in a box.

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