DSCOVR

Mon, 2007-10-22 10:50Mitchell Anderson
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Did Bush’s Mars Plan Scuttle DSCOVR?

When the now-Nobel Laureate Al Gore proposed the DSCOVR mission way back in 1998, he was widely jeered by Republicans for interfering in the scientific business of NASA.

“Gore-sat”, “Gore-cam”, and “the multi-million dollar screen saver” were all quips trotted out on the floor of the Senate and Congress in opposition to the mission.

DSCOVR was a victim of such partisan politics. Even though it is fully completed at a cost of $100 million, this unique spacecraft remains in a storage box in Maryland, rather than providing critical data on the progress of climate change.
NASA quietly cancelled DSCOVR last year, citing “competing priorities”.

What could they be? Perhaps the biggest was George Bush’s edict NASA in January 2004 to put a human on the surface of Mars.

Fri, 2007-10-19 18:18Mitchell Anderson
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Whitehouse Stonewalls DSCOVR Information Request

If you're not interested in the issue of climate change, fine, but this story is as much about that as it is about a new ruling that further erodes your right to information from your government.
Digging up information on the cancellation of the DSCOVR climate satellite mission has been like pulling teeth. The dental work continued this week, this time with the Whitehouse.

Last month, I filed a Freedom of Information Request (FOIA) to the Office of Administration in Washington DC, asking for copies of any records “relating to the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission, formerly known as Triana, from the period January 1, 2000 to the present.” (documents attached to the end of this post).

Update: someone just sent this Washington Post article to us, seems we're pretty justified in our outrage.

Wed, 2007-09-12 21:38Mitchell Anderson
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Uncover DSCOVR Part 3: Digging for Answers from NASA

My entry into the DSCOVR mission intrigue happened last year when I pitched the idea to SEED magazine for a feature article on the project.
 
DSCOVR was quietly killed by NASA in January 2006 and it seemed awfully strange to me that a fully completed climate satellite costing $100 million would be mothballed after it had been built.
 
Stranger still was that virtually every scientist I interviewed as I researched this piece expressed something between guarded disappointment to full-blown outrage that what they considered crucial mission had been canceled.
 
This is part 3 in Mitchell Anderson's investigative series on the DSCOVR climate satellite. Please help us in our research on this important project by donating to DeSmogBlog. Thanks to all those people who already have.
Wed, 2007-08-29 22:45Emily Murgatroyd
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Donate to Operation Uncover DSCOVR - we need your help!

Step up DeSmogBlog fans. We need your help in finding out who killed the Deep Space Observatory project.

The more donations we receive the more resources we can throw behind this project. We have an opportunity to shine the light on the politics behind global warming at their worst. Click here to donate, it all adds up, so whatever you can afford.

And here's the cheeky DSCOVR “advertisement” we are sending around the blog-o-sphere. Enjoy!

Wed, 2007-08-29 09:00Mitchell Anderson
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A DeSmogBlog exclusive investigation into NASA's DSCOVR climate station

Somewhere in Maryland is a metal box containing a fully completed climate spacecraft called the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) that could save the world.

What happened? How could the US government possibly justify killing DSCOVR given the importance of climate change and after over 90% of the project expenses had already been incurred? What role did petty partisan politics play in this? Did the oil lobby have any influence on this decision?

Over the next few months I'm going to dig into the history of DSCOVR, the reasons why it was canceled, and why NASA refuses to release any internal documents on the decision to kill the mission.

Click here to donate to our research project and help find out who killed the DSCOVR project.

Mon, 2007-08-27 20:19Kevin Grandia
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DeSmogBlog welcomes Mitchell Anderson to the investigative team

The DeSmogBlog team welcomes writer and researcher Mitchell Anderson to the team.

Over the next few months Mitchell will be writing an investigative series on the US administration's mothballing of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).

Mon, 2006-10-02 15:12Mitchell Anderson
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Anyone for a DSCOVR Bake Sale?

A satellite that might save the world has been sitting in a metal box in a NASA building for the last five years - very likely due to the cynical politics of climate change.

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