hybrid

Fri, 2011-11-04 07:38Farron Cousins
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IBM Launches 2nd Annual Smarter Cities Challenge

At a time when corporations’ misdeeds are under a bright spotlight (and rightfully so,) we needn’t overlook the few companies that are working to bring innovation and technology to cities across the planet in desperate need of modernization. One of those companies is IBM, which is currently working on its 2nd annual Smarter Cities Challenge.

The program for this year will include a $50 million grant to cities to help improve infrastructure, technology, and energy efficiency. From a press release on this year’s program:

This highly successful grant program provides select applicant cities with access to teams of elite IBM employees with expertise on a variety of urban-related matters, such as finance, sustainability, public safety, and citizen services. They devote weeks of their time analyzing unique opportunities and challenges facing municipalities, particularly within the context of today's challenging economic climate. After conferring with officials, citizens, businesses, academics and community leaders, the IBM teams recommend actions to make the delivery of services to citizens more efficient and innovative. Issues addressed include jobs, health, public safety, transportation, social services, recreation, education, energy, and sustainability.

Earlier this year, IBM’s Smarter Cities Challenge announced its 2011 grant winners, which included grants for much-needed environmental improvements in developing areas. For example, the city of Antofagasta, Chile received grants to help improve their irrigation systems, a social media infrastructure to voice environmental concerns, and an sustainable green energy program that will pull in government, academics, and private sector companies to help shift the city to cleaner, renewable energy programs.

Tue, 2007-05-22 15:39Emily Murgatroyd
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Taxi!

New York City Mayor, Michael Bloomberg, announced today that every yellow cab in the city would be a fuel efficient hybrid by 2012. Bloomberg plans to phase in the new taxis incrementally and estimates that the savings per taxi will add up to at least $10,000 per year.

While the plan will ultimately reduce carbon emissions by 200,000 metric tons, the city's overall emissions total a whopping 58.3 million metric tons in 2005 alone! Let's hope that this is one of many plans to reduce overall emissions.

Read more: Taxi!
Tue, 2007-04-03 15:09Kevin Grandia
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Fuel efficient Toyota sales up 11.7% in U.S. - auto industry fights emissions standards

Today's reported auto-industry numbers, show just how backwards things have become in the fight to reduce oil consumption and reduce C02 emissions.

Yesterday, we reported here on the hypocrisy of the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturer's fighting a Supreme Court ruling that could enact tough new CO2 emissions standards on cars and trucks, while stating at the same time on their website that, “Members of the Alliance believe that it is prudent to reduce emissions, including carbon dioxide…”


Sun, 2007-02-11 22:13Richard Littlemore
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Putting the Fun in Responsible Living

I can imagine a world in which urban design is so sensible and public transit so convenient that private automobiles become redundant. In the meantime, it's nice to think that we might still have cars that are fun to drive , even if they aren't based on gas guzzling vehicles of war.
Fri, 2006-12-01 11:55Kevin Grandia
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Banks boost lo-cost loans for eco-friendly cars

In a bid to do a little good for the world, some credit unions are offering programs where they will give you a car loan at the prime lending rate (currently 6%) if you buy a hybrid.
Thu, 2006-09-28 15:27Sarah Pullman
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The Straight Scoop on Hybrid Concerns

Thanks to our friend Darren for passing along this informative article about seven main concerns about buying a hybrid vehicle.

I've listed the concerns below, but you'll need to click through to read the responses!
  1. Hybrids have complicated technology that is difficult or expensive to fix
  2. Hybrids have limited battery pack life
  3. Hybrids have technical problems like stalling and sputtering
  4. Hybrids do not pay for themselves to justify their premium cost
  5. Hybrids do not offer the driving performance needed
  6. Hybrids will not hold resale value
  7. Hybrids do not get the level of mileage promised
As it turns out, only three of the above concerns are deemed truly “legitimate” – most notably the fact that currently, a normal user can't really save enough on gas to justify the high price of a hybrid. (There are of course other, more altruistic, reasons to invest in a hybrid.)

If you've ever toyed with the idea of buying one, it's an article worth checking out.


Wed, 2006-09-13 23:37Kevin Grandia
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Forget hybrid, try the TRI-brid

The Prius is great, but the new Brazilian-made “Obvio” kicks hybrid up to the next level, the “tri”brid technology. Recently unveiled, the 3 passenger Obvio Tribrid uses hybrid technology, like the Prius, but can also run purely on ethanol fuel. According to Zap, the American distributor, these next generation commuter cars are the only US cars that can run 100% on ethanol.
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