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Fri, 2008-06-20 12:52Ross Gelbspan
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Are We Making Nature More Extremist Than Al Queda?

As greenhouse-gas emissions rise, North America is likely to experience more droughts and excessive heat in some regions even as intense downpours and hurricanes pound others more often, according to a report issued yesterday by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program.


Fri, 2008-04-18 10:36Mitchell Anderson
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Did NASA Mislead the Media About the DSCOVR Climate Project?

New information provided by inside sources to DeSmogBlog raises questions about public statements from NASA when asked by the media about the cost of launching Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).

The date was January 24, 2008. Four NASA senior brass had just finished delivering a rambling one hour news briefing on their much-maligned Earth sciences program - noteworthy only in that there was no news. No new announcements. No new missions.

Seth Borenstein, the science reporter for Associated Press rose to ask the first question, specifically about why NASA had not launched DSCOVR.

Fri, 2008-03-28 12:45Mitchell Anderson
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Government Insider Document Shows Critical Importance of DSCOVR Climate Satellite


A fresh document recently provided to DeSmog Blog by inside sources shows the critical importance of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) to the US government.
 
The document is available for viewing here, and favorably compares DSCOVR’s capabilities with the stated science priorities of NOAA. The conclusion: the spacecraft would be a boon to monitoring our rapidly warming planet and tracking dangerous solar flares.
Wed, 2008-03-19 20:04Mitchell Anderson
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Did the Whitehouse Kill DSCOVR?

Fresh documents have trickled out of the US government indicating that direction from the Whitehouse may have had a direct hand in killing the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).
 
DeSmog Blog has been researching an investigative series on this mothballed climate change spacecraft designed to monitor the energy budget of the planet from the unique vantage of 1 million miles away.
 
NASA strangely cancelled the project after spending over $100 million building it. Prominent members of the scientific community were outraged at the decision. You can view their laundry list of letters here.
Tue, 2008-02-19 09:23Mitchell Anderson
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NOAA Stonewalls on DCSOVR Documents

The stonewalling on DSCOVR documents continues, this time with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

To recap, NASA was given over $100 million in taxpayers money to build the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), a spacecraft designed to measure the energy budget of our warming planet from the unique vantage of a million miles away.

Even though it is fully completed over five years ago, DSCOVR is still sitting in a box at the Goddard Space Centre – likely for political reasons.

The mission was originally promoted by Al Gore – a liability when George Bush and Dick Cheney remain in the Whitehouse.

Tue, 2007-11-20 09:13Mitchell Anderson
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NASA stonewalls another US agency that wants to launch DSCOVR

It has now been several months since the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) formally requested that NASA transfer to them all DSVOVR assets - including of course the spacecraft itself.
 
The response from NASA? Nothing. Nada. Zippo.
 
Incredibly, NASA has so far completely ignored colleagues from another US government agency that want to make use of a $100 million spacecraft that NASA themselves stated last year they have no intention of launching.

Fri, 2007-09-28 15:50Mitchell Anderson
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Could DSCOVR be saved by NOAA?

Here is the latest bizarre twist in our investigative series on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).

To recap, NASA was given over $100 million in taxpayers money to build a spacecraft that would look at the energy budget of our planet from a unique perspective. Even though it is fully completed over five years ago, it is still sitting in a box at the Goddard Space Centre.

According to leading scientists in a recent paper in the esteemed journal Science, this spacecraft would dispel much existing uncertainty about the pace of climate change.

Wed, 2007-08-29 12:45Emily Murgatroyd
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Greenouse gas behind 2006 record warming in the US

According to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Greenhouse gases, and not the ocean current El Nino, accounted for temperatures in the United States that were close to a record high last year, U.S. government climate scientists said today.
Tue, 2007-08-28 14:01Kevin Grandia
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NOAA vs. NASA hottest year in the US still officially 1998

No offense to NASA, but as far as maintaining the official US surface temperature records, it's the job of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

And according to the official NOAA records, the 10 hottest years begin with 1998, followed by 2006.

But according to recent histrionics from the climate change denial industry, 1998 is no longer the hottest year in the US, it's 1934.
Mon, 2007-05-07 08:41Kevin Grandia
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What's the carbon-weather looking like today?

Okay, you can't check today's “carbon-weather” but you can see what it was in the past. Check out this site created by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that provides a global perspective of carbon uptake and release.

The image above is the North American carbon weather on January 1, 2005.

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