NOAA

NOAA Stonewalls on DCSOVR Documents

The stonewalling on DSCOVR documents continues, this time with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

To recap, NASA was given over $100 million in taxpayers money to build the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), a spacecraft designed to measure the energy budget of our warming planet from the unique vantage of a million miles away.

Even though it is fully completed over five years ago, DSCOVR is still sitting in a box at the Goddard Space Centre – likely for political reasons.

The mission was originally promoted by Al Gore – a liability when George Bush and Dick Cheney remain in the Whitehouse.

NASA stonewalls another US agency that wants to launch DSCOVR

It has now been several months since the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) formally requested that NASA transfer to them all DSVOVR assets - including of course the spacecraft itself.
 
The response from NASA? Nothing. Nada. Zippo.
 
Incredibly, NASA has so far completely ignored colleagues from another US government agency that want to make use of a $100 million spacecraft that NASA themselves stated last year they have no intention of launching.

Could DSCOVR be saved by NOAA?

Here is the latest bizarre twist in our investigative series on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR).

To recap, NASA was given over $100 million in taxpayers money to build a spacecraft that would look at the energy budget of our planet from a unique perspective. Even though it is fully completed over five years ago, it is still sitting in a box at the Goddard Space Centre.

According to leading scientists in a recent paper in the esteemed journal Science, this spacecraft would dispel much existing uncertainty about the pace of climate change.

Greenouse gas behind 2006 record warming in the US

According to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Greenhouse gases, and not the ocean current El Nino, accounted for temperatures in the United States that were close to a record high last year, U.S. government climate scientists said today.

NOAA vs. NASA hottest year in the US still officially 1998

No offense to NASA, but as far as maintaining the official US surface temperature records, it's the job of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

And according to the official NOAA records, the 10 hottest years begin with 1998, followed by 2006.

But according to recent histrionics from the climate change denial industry, 1998 is no longer the hottest year in the US, it's 1934.

What's the carbon-weather looking like today?

Okay, you can't check today's “carbon-weather” but you can see what it was in the past. Check out this site created by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that provides a global perspective of carbon uptake and release.

The image above is the North American carbon weather on January 1, 2005.

US admin. interference with climate science exposed in whistleblower report

The watchdog Government Accountability Project has released a 138-page report (pdf.) on the White House-orchestrated plot to suppress climate-change research that deviated from Bush administration policy.

Here's a realplayer webcast of the House Science Committee hearing where the report was release today.

Why Is The Sky Falling? US Won't Pay To Find Out

The government's ability to understand and predict hurricanes, drought and climate changes of all kinds is in danger because of deep cuts facing many Earth satellite programs and major delays in launching some of its most important new instruments.

2006 Fifth Warmest Year on Record

Despite beginning the year with a chilling La Niña, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) advises that 2006 was the fifth-warmest year in recorded history and the hottest year in the U.S.

Check the attached graph and see if you buy the Dr. Bob Carter's contention that global warming ended in 1998.

It's Official!

The 2006 average annual temperature for the continental U.S. was the warmest on record, scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said. The agency began keeping such records in 1895.

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