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Let’s quit sidestepping the facts; global warming is tied to too many people

Relentless human-population growth coupled with rising consumption has outpaced the planet’s ability to cope. An article in BBC’s Green Room says we are now in “overshoot” – our numbers and levels of consumption greater than Earth's capacity to sustain us for the long-term. The writer says we must end world population growth, and then reduce population size in industrialized as well as developing nations.

Gore takes post with investment firm; vows to donate salary to climate protection

The former VP and Nobel laureate will investigate the growth potential of start-up companies focused on alternative energy sources, and then make recommendations to the California firm he represents as to whether they should receive venture-capital financing.

Former Gore advisor warns that global warming could sound death knell for globalization

“The Age of Consequences” report by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in the US, predicts that scarcity of resources may “dictate the terms of international relations” for years to come as rich countries could “go through a 30-year process of kicking away from the lifeboat.”

Another report says energy needs in 2030 could rise more than 50% above current levels, mainly due to rapid economic growth in China and India. So who’s going to be kicking who?

More than just a pain in the butt, those pesky speed bumps also hasten global warming

Canada’s housing agency has concluded that speed bumps not only fuel anger among drivers – who have to slow down to approach a bump, then speed up, then slow down for the next one – but also increase fuel consumption and cause more greenhouse-gas emissions than if they were traveling at a constant speed.

Poll shows governments lag behind citizens in readiness to tackle global warming

A sweeping global survey conducted for BBC World Service has found people are far more willing to make financial and lifestyle sacrifices to arrest climate change than most leaders acknowledge. But whatever else politicians think of the findings, they will certainly pounce on respondents’ willingness to pay higher taxes.

Legislation making UK first to put carbon cuts into law still 'inadequate'

The British government says new legislation will save four million tonnes of carbon dioxide a year by 2020 and help spread responsibility for collaring climate change right across the economy. A key thrust, however, will be to expand carbon trading, which means paying others to clean up our mess.

Growth has already pushed Earth past tipping point, new study says

A soon-to-be-released UN report says runaway economic growth has pushed greenhouse-gas emissions to dangerous levels much faster than previously estimated, and instead of reaching the threshold within a decade, new research indicates it was actually crossed two years ago. The findings will highlight the perils of giving economic growth priority over efforts to curtail global warming.

In a classic display of corporate cynicism, Toyota fights stronger emission standards in U.S.

As the U.S. Congress debates the first substantial fuel-economy boost in decades for automakers, Toyota has joined Detroit in the fight to sustain the practices that have imperiled the planet and driven American car manufacturers to the brink of bankruptcy.

Why would the industry leader in fuel-efficient cars take such a reckless path amid growing awareness of global warming? Because there’s a lot more money to be made if Toyota can slow innovation in Detroit and sustain gas-guzzling.

If only Bush would follow his own good example on global warming

The U.S. president, notorious for his long-standing opposition to fixed mandates to cut greenhouse-gas emissions, enacted legislation while governor of Texas that required energy companies to produce 5,000 megawatts of electricity from renewable sources by 2015. The legislation set penalties for those that failed to meet their requirements, and prodded them to invest in renewable energy.

Canada’s CEOs urge 'aggressive' action on global warming

An organization of Canadian chief executives says climate change is the “most pressing and daunting” issue the world faces today and business must do its share to fight the problem. The cost will be great, they say, and government intervention will be needed.