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The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change today released its third and final summary on the state of climate change. The report, entitled Summary for Policymakers: mitigation of climate change, outlines what the problem is, how we should be dealing with it and how much it's going to cost.

Short-sighted Canada Fails with New Climate Policy

Climate change has forced the world to a crossroads, presenting countries like Canada with a choice and a challenge: we can try to hold on to our dying and outmoded economic activities, risking the future of all humanity, or we can innovate and adapt, creating a new economic model that will assure our prosperity for another century.

Canada, with the disappointing announcement of its latest climate change plan, has clearly chosen to bury its head in the oily sands of the old ways. We have chosen to protect the kings of yesterday’s economy at the risk of our environmental health – and our economic prosperity – in the future.

New analysis: Chinese and Saudi Diplomats Water Down Global Warming Estimates

This is a DeSmogBlog release sent out to media this morning:


Chinese and Saudi Diplomats Water Down Global Warming Estimates

Go here for the full release and a copy of the analysis report.

Al Gore's Energy Bill: The Power of Tattletelling

The Tennessee Centre for Policy Research claims to be an independent and non-partisan policy think tank, a characterization that is hard to sustain since the Centre made itself famous by releasing a hyped account of Al Gore's personal electricity consumption. 


VANCOUVER – Yesterday, the Chicago-based Heartland Institute launched an ad campaign calling former vice president Gore to a public debate on global warming. In response, the DeSmogBlog challenges the Heartland Institute to a debate on the harmful effects of second-hand tobacco smoke.

A correction to this post has been made, see here.

James Inhofe: The Senator for Suspect Science

Oklahoma Senator James Inhofe got so beligerent with former Vice-President Al Gore at the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works last week that new Chair Barbara Boxer had to cut him off (check out the video at the end of this post).

That, presumably, is because Senator Inhofe is accustomed to a different quality of input in testimony before this committee. When he was chair, he preferred likeminded lobbyists (Joseph Bast, Heartland Institute, testimony here) and fiction writers (Michael Chrichton, testimony here) as witnesses to committee hearings.

James Inhofe: The Senator for Oil and Gas

James Inhofe, former chair of the Senate Committee on the Environment and Public Works and the leading Republican climate change denier recieved more in donations from the oil and gas sector than any other Senator, in the 2002 election cycle. According to the latest available election financing data, in the last five years Inhofe has received just over $3.4 million in donations from 20 industry sectors - almost $1 million (29%) is from the Energy/Natural Resources Sector and their respective PACS.

'The science is clear. It leaves no room for procrastination. Global warming is real.'

With those words, the government of the Canadian province of British Columbia took what might be the most aggressive leadership position in the world on the issue of global warming.

The quote - that headline - is taken from the provincial Speech from the Throne, a broad statement of intent that parliamentary governments use to begin new sessions of the legislature. As such, it is a policy statement, rather than a legislated commitment. But the vision - the sheer audacity - of that stated policy puts British Columbia at the forefront of the global battle against climate change.

Kennedy in a "Huff" about Exxon Mischief

It's nice to see the story of ExxonMobil's climate change misinformation campaign being reported in so prominent as place as the blog Huffington Post, and nice to see so credible a source as Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

Canadian Policy Vacuum a National Embarrassment

It was deeply disappointing in the last week to see the contrast between the state of climate science in the world and the state of climate policy in Canada.

While the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was telling the world that global warming is undeniable and that the implications for humankind may be severe, indeed, new Canadian Environment Minister John Baird, inset, was telling Canadians that any effort to meet Canada's international Kyoto commitments would devastate the Canadian economy.